Daimler Starts Construction Of New Battery Factory In Alabama

Mercedes-Benz Cars To Build Sixth Battery Production Site In Thailand Investment announcement of $1 billion made during the Tuscaloosa based plant’s 20th anniversary celebration last year is now showing off first results.Groundbreaking ceremony for a new Mercedes-Benz battery plant in Tuscaloosa.First new Mercedes-Benz GLE rolls off the line at Mercedes-Benz plant in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.Building of a new consolidation center in Woodstock, Alabama to be operational in 2019.Markus Schäfer, Member of the Divisional Board of Mercedes-Benz Cars, Production and Supply Chain: “We aim to play a pioneering role in the development of e-mobility and are well-prepared to accomplish this mission.” Daimler will produce battery packs in AlabamaAs announced in September 2017, Daimler starts construction of the battery pack factory in the U.S., seven miles from its Mercedes-Benz Cars vehicle production site in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.The battery factory is the biggest part of the latest $1 billion investment in the production facilities in Tuscaloosa. Daimler intends to produce packs for EQ-branded all-electric and/or plug-in hybrid models. There are no details onmodels or production volume for now, besides “for future electric SUV under the EQ brand”.The Tuscaloosa plant recently began production of the all-new Mercedes-Benz GLE.“One year ago, we have announced $1 billion investment in Tuscaloosa mostly for the production of electric SUVs and a battery plant. We are bringing electric mobility for Mercedes-Benz to the United States.”“The investment of billions of US-Dollars in the U.S. car production of Mercedes-Benz is paying off: The first all new Mercedes-Benz GLE left the production lines bringing a new driver experience to our customers worldwide. At the same time, the electric initiative of Mercedes-Benz Cars in the U.S. is well on track. A groundbreaking ceremony marks the start of the construction of a new battery factory. The factory next to the vehicle plant in Tuscaloosa providing batteries for future electric SUV under the EQ brand.” Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on October 8, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Daimler To Add Even More Battery Production For Plug-In Cars Daimler annocuned that battery packs for various models will be produced at eight factories at six sites around the world. We can identify seven factories (seems that one more will be announced).two plants in Kamenz, Germanyplant in Beijing, Chinaplant in Tuscaloosa, Alabamaplant in Bangkok, Thailandplant in Untertuerkheim, Germanyplant in Sindelfingen, GermanyBatteries will be supplied for more than 130 electrified models, scheduled for introduction by 2022.“The new battery facility near the Tuscaloosa plant is part of a global battery production network of in total eight factories in Kamenz, (Germany), Stuttgart-Untertürkheim (Germany), Sindelfingen (Germany), Beijing (China), Bangkok (Thailand) and Tuscaloosa (USA). The worldwide network of battery factories allows Mercedes-Benz to react flexibly and efficiently to market demands and requirements. The different sites supply local vehicle production and are ready to export batteries, if required. Mercedes-Benz Cars will offer at least one electrified vehicle in each model series by 2022 totaling up to more than 130 models. Mercedes-Benz is about to start the production of electric passenger cars as part of its worldwide electric initiative. This includes the production of an all-electric SUV in the U.S.”.embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Press blast:Electric Initiative in the U.S. well on track: Mercedes-Benz starts construction for battery factory next to U.S. vehicle plant Renault-Nissan, Daimler Might Cooperate On Battery Tech Official start of construction works for the new battery factory nearby the Mercedes-Benz plant Tuscaloosa (Mercedes-Benz U.S. International – MBUSI/Alabama): Markus Schäfer, Member of the Divisional Board of Management Mercedes-Benz Cars, Production and Supply Chain, with Kay Ivey, Governor of Alabama, and Jason Hoff, President and CEO of MBUSI (L to R)Tuscaloosa, AL/USA – The investment of billions of US-Dollars in the U.S. car production of Mercedes-Benz is paying off: The first all new Mercedes-Benz GLE which is based on a completely new SUV platform, left the production lines today bringing a new driver experience to our customers worldwide. At the same time, the electric initiative of Mercedes-Benz Cars in the U.S. is well on track. A groundbreaking ceremony today marks the start of the construction of a new battery factory. The factory will be built near the vehicle production site in Tuscaloosa providing batteries for future electric SUV under the product and technology brand EQ.Markus Schäfer, Member of the Divisional Board of Mercedes-Benz Cars, Production and Supply Chain, attended the ceremony: “The widely export oriented Mercedes-Benz plant in Tuscaloosa is a high-tech production facility with a successful history and an exciting future in terms of our brand in the United States. We aim to play a pioneering role in the development of e-mobility and are well prepared to accomplish this mission. One year ago, we have announced $1 billion investment in Tuscaloosa mostly for the production of electric SUVs and a battery plant. We are bringing electric mobility for Mercedes-Benz to the United States. Around the globe, we are preparing six sites for production of EQ models and our battery network will consist of eight factories.”The groundbreaking ceremony took place in the presence of Jason Hoff, President and CEO of Mercedes-Benz U.S International, the Governor of Alabama Kay Ivey and other distinguished regional and international guests at its location in Bibb County, Alabama. The new production site for batteries – along with the new Consolidation Center – is located seven miles from the Mercedes-Benz Cars vehicle production site in Tuscaloosa. The Consolidation Center, also announced as part of the 2017 investment announcement, will consist of three major areas, including the body parts preparation area, the assembly parts preparation area and the empties storage. It is expected to be operational in 2019.More than $6 billion has already been invested in the Tuscaloosa plant since 1995. The additional $1 billion will help Mercedes-Benz Cars expand its industrial footprint in the region, most of which is slated for the electric initiative. It is expected that, once completed, these investments will create more than 600 additional jobs in Alabama.New GLE made in TuscaloosaPrior to the groundbreaking ceremony, Mercedes-Benz U.S. International, Inc. (MBUSI) today celebrated the start of production of the first new Mercedes-Benz GLE. Tuscaloosa has served as the traditional production site for SUVs since 1997. This factory supplies the current GLE, GLE Coupé and GLS models to customers worldwide. These models are made exclusively in Alabama and two thirds of them are exported to almost every country in the world. Therewith MBUSI is the second largest automotive exporter in the U.S. More than two million customers have decided in favor of the off-roader since the launch of the M-Class, and the GLE is the bestselling SUV in the history of Mercedes-Benz. Worldwide, more than five million customers have opted for an SUV made by Mercedes-Benz. A new record was set by the SUVs in the first eight months of this year: Worldwide, more than 540,000 units were delivered, an increase of 5.4%. With the start of production of the new Mercedes-Benz GLE the plant will enhance its proven production portfolio. The new GLE is better in every aspect: more capable on the road, more capable off the road and more capable in bringing friends and family along: now with an optional third row of seats. And the new E-ACTIVE-BODY-CONTROL chassis offers a new dimension of a smooth ride.“The successful story of the Mercedes-Benz Tuscaloosa plant began with the start of production of the M-Class 21 years ago. We are proud to see further investment into Tuscaloosa, which underlines the effort and teamwork by all our team members. As a team here in Tuscaloosa, we play a key role in the global success of Mercedes-Benz and we are proud that the all new GLE will again be produced in Alabama for the world demand”, said Jason Hoff, President and CEO of Mercedes-Benz U.S. International.Only two years after inventing the car, Daimler started business in the U.S. as the first ever car manufacturer back in 1888. For 130 years, Daimler has been anchored within the U.S. economy and has contributed to its development, generates and secures jobs as well as promoting new technologies and the plant is on track to continue to do so in the future.“Just as Mercedes helped put our state on the cutting-edge of automotive manufacturing, Alabama will help put Mercedes on the cutting-edge of electric vehicle development,” Governor Kay Ivey said. “We continuously strive to reaffirm the ‘Made in Alabama’ brand as one of excellence. So, naturally, there is no better state for Mercedes to build upon their world-class brand of excellence than right here in Alabama.”The Electric Initiative in the United StatesThe new battery facility near the Tuscaloosa plant is part of a global battery production network of in total eight factories in Kamenz, (Germany), Stuttgart-Untertürkheim (Germany), Sindelfingen (Germany), Beijing (China), Bangkok (Thailand) and Tuscaloosa (USA). The worldwide network of battery factories allows Mercedes-Benz to react flexibly and efficiently to market demands and requirements. The different sites supply local vehicle production and are ready to export batteries, if required. Mercedes-Benz Cars will offer at least one electrified vehicle in each model series by 2022                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           totaling up to more than 130 models. Mercedes-Benz is about to start the production of electric passenger cars as part of its worldwide electric initiative. This includes the production of an all-electric SUV in the U.S.About Mercedes-Benz Tuscaloosa plantMBUSI – located in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama – is the production location for the GLE, GLS and GLE Coupe SUVs around the world, as well as the C-Class sedan for North America. In 2017, the plant produced around 300,000 vehicles. MBUSI currently employs more than 3,700 team members on the approximately 1,000 acres site and it supports more than an estimated 10,000 indirect jobs at suppliers and service providers in the region. In its 20 year existence, more than $6 billion have been invested in the plant to pave the way for the production of future SUV’s. The expansion makes plant Tuscaloosa one of the “smartest” automotive facilities in the world.About Daimler in the U.S.Daimler Group subsidiaries have been firmly established in the United States for decades. As employers, exporters, and good corporate citizens, they provide billions of dollars in direct and indirect support to the U.S. economy. Daimler Group Companies employ around 26,000 people in the United States. The Companies indirectly support an estimated 150,000 additional jobs across the country. At 23 main locations throughout the USA the Group’s subsidiaries primarily manufacture passenger cars and commercial vehicles, but is also represented with Daimler Financial Services, car2go and moovel as well as several Research and Development locations. Source: Electric Vehicle News Daimler battery news read more

Tesla got defrauded of almost 10 million in embezzlement scheme by a

first_imgThe U.S. Department of Justice announced this week that they charged a former Tesla employee over an embezzlement scheme that might have cost the automaker almost $10 million. more…The post Tesla got defrauded of almost $10 million in embezzlement scheme by a manager, says DOJ appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Tesla opens Model 3 orders to the public in Europe and China

first_imgAfter opening Model 3 orders to reservation holders in Europe and China, Tesla is now opening its online design studio to the entire public in order to get more orders ahead of the start of deliveries in those markets. more…The post Tesla opens Model 3 orders to the public in Europe and China appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Where is Teslas 35000 Model 3

first_imgTesla’s Model 3 is already quite successful based on many metrics, but Tesla is still failing on arguably the most important promise: a starting price of $35,000.Is the standard Model 3 still coming and where is it now? more…The post Where is Tesla’s $35,000 Model 3? appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Hyundai reveals full Kona EV US prices – starting at 36450

first_imgHyundai had already announced the base price of the Kona EV, its new all-electric version of the Kona crossover, in the US last year, $36,450 before incentives, but it has now released all the prices based on the different trims. more…The post Hyundai reveals full Kona EV U.S. prices – starting at $36,450 appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Watch Tesla Roadster Insanely Accelerate In Imagined Video

first_img Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 24, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News The new Roadster officially can hit 60 MPH in just 1.9 seconds (watch that blistering acceleration here). This imaginary video attempts to recreate the Roadster’s sheer speed. As the Roadster slowly rolls by, you can see it’s not the real deal. A few moments later, the accelerator is smashed down and the Roadster disappears in a flash.Tesla Roadster’s insane specs:Acceleration 0-60 mph 1.9 sec – 1/4 mile 8.8 secTop Speed Over 250 mphWheel Torque 10,000 NmMile Range 620 miles200 kWh battery packSeating 4Drive All-Wheel Drive (three motors – two for rear wheels, and one for front axle)Base Price $200,000Base Reservation $50,000Founders Series Price $250,000Founders Series Reservation (1,000 reservations available) $250,000Though this particular video is a fake, we’ve seen the real Roadster accelerate (see further down below) and it sure is fast..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }Down below we’ve included some real footage of the new Tesla Roadster accelerating. This is from way back in November 2017 when Tesla first debuted the next-gen Roadster..embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; } Elon Musk Says New Tesla Roadster Will Fly Watch Insane Reactions To Tesla Roadster’s Stupidly Quick Acceleration And poof…it’s gone.The next-generation Tesla Roadster is so insanely quick that you blink and it’s gone.More Tesla Roadster News Source: Electric Vehicle News See How One Guy Earned Two Tesla Roadsters in 2 Monthslast_img read more

Star clusters may harbor dark matter

first_imgGlobular clusters—bunches of a few thousand stars that orbit around much larger galaxies—may be harboring a dark secret. Our galaxy, the Milky Way, has about 150 globular clusters around it and, until recently, these were the only ones near enough to study in detail. Now, a team of astronomers has taken a close look at some of the 2000 clusters (circled in picture above) around Centaurus A, our nearest giant galaxy. The team used the Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) attached to Europe’s Very Large Telescope in Chile. FLAMES is equipped with 130 optical fibers, which astronomers position precisely at the point where the telescope forms an image. That allows light from 130 different targets to be captured and sent separately to a spectrograph, which measures how bright they are at different wavelengths. Using FLAMES, the team could measure the movement of stars in 125 different clusters around Centaurus A to get estimates of their masses. In most cases, those mass estimates chimed closely with how bright the clusters appeared—as expected from observing the Milky Way’s clusters. But, as the researchers report online today in The Astrophysical Journal, some deviated from this rule and seemed to be several times more massive than their brightness suggests. These seemingly overweight clusters could contain black holes or other dark remnants of old stars, but the team believes that can’t totally explain the observations. Could it be that some clusters are harboring dark matter, the mysterious stuff that provides galaxies with enough gravity to hold together? Theorists don’t currently think that globular clusters contain much dark matter, but because very little is known about the stuff it could be the answer to this unexpected breed of star cluster.last_img read more

Criticism mounts of a longcontroversial chronic fatigue study

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img The authors of a controversial 2011 trial that showed that exercise and behavioral therapy could help treat chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) today released a follow-up study that supports their original findings. But the new report comes on the heels of a lengthy and highly critical examination of the original trial by a journalist.At issue is an $8 million trial run in the United Kingdom, dubbed PACE, which examined a number of treatments for CFS, a disease also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) that has no known cause. In The Lancet, the PACE researchers reported that patients with CFS/ME experienced “moderate improvements” in their symptoms if they did a program of graded exercise or cognitive behavior therapy. Two other interventions tested, so-called specialist medical care and adaptive pacing therapy, did not help.The Lancet study drew immediate fire from patient groups, with some complaining that it appeared to suggest that CFS/ME is a psychological, rather than physical, disorder. Many researchers, meanwhile, argued that some of the study’s methods were seriously flawed. As The Lancet itself noted in an editorial a few months after publishing the 2011 study, the “response to the trial’s publication was swift and damning.” On 21 October, journalist David Tuller, who helps oversee a journalism program at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, published the first installment of a four-part series re-examining the trial. The series, “Trial by Error,” appears on the virology blog run by Columbia University microbiologist Vincent Racaniello.Tuller writes that after the PACE results were published, people with CFS/ME “bristled with offense at the suggestion they would get better if only they could change their perceptions about their condition.” And “pushing themselves to be more active not only wasn’t helpful, they insisted, but could trigger a serious and extended relapse.”Tuller quotes several scientists lambasting the PACE study for everything from its methodology and outcome measures to alleged conflicts of interest involving its authors. He reports that the authors did not reply to his inquiries. Comments about his series are flooding websites run by CFS/ME groups.The authors of the PACE study today added fuel to the fire, releasing an online paper in The Lancet Psychiatry that reports on a long-term follow-up of trial participants. It concludes that the benefits of the interventions were maintained.In the follow-up, a team led by psychiatrist Michael Sharpe of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom sent questionnaires to 604 of the trial participants and asked them to self-rate their health. The 481 participants who responded reflected a statistically valid sample of the patients who received the four interventions.After analyzing the responses, the researchers concluded that the benefits reported in the original study, which assessed participants at 1 year, were maintained for at least another 1.5 years. But the participants randomized to receive the two interventions that initially did nothing also improved, and there “was little evidence of differences in outcomes” when compared with the people in the other treatment groups. The authors suggest that this is because the people in the ineffective groups later decided to seek out graded exercise and cognitive behavior therapy.“These are not magic cures,” said Sharpe at a press conference in London today. “This is just the only game in town really in terms of an evidence-based treatment if you have got this condition to get yourself improved.”Rona Moss-Morris, a psychologist at King’s College London who was not involved in the study, said, “I think this is a robust study with some limitations that the authors have been clear about.”But in Tuller’s takedown of the PACE study, Arthur Reingold, an epidemiologist at UC Berkeley, is sharply critical of the original trial’s design. “Under the circumstances, an independent review of the trial conducted by experts not involved in the design or conduct of the study would seem to be very much in order,” Reingold asserts. University College London Neurologist Jonathan Edwards told Tuller that the PACE data are “a mass of uninterpretability” and said “the issues with the trial are extremely worrying.”At the press conference, Sharpe said he doesn’t think there’s “a growing army of people upset about this,” and he stressed that their findings are not suggesting that CFS/ME is a mental illness. “It’s sometimes quite hard to understand what motivates the very vocal minority that gets so upset about this apparently benign bit of moderately helpful treatment,” he said.last_img read more

Trump team puts controversial red team challenge to climate science on hold

first_img After the talk, the red team “has been put on hold,” according to someone familiar with the meeting.President Trump has privately told Pruitt he supports a public debate to challenge mainstream climate science, administration officials told E&E News (Climatewire, 11 December). But the administration isn’t unified behind the idea, and an official said prior to this week’s meeting that “Pruitt has not been given authorization to go ahead with red team, blue team; there are still many issues to be ironed out.”That came after Pruitt told House lawmakers last week that work on the red team is “ongoing” but that details could be unveiled as early as next month. “We may be able to get there as early as January next year,” he said.It appears there are still some sticking points within the administration, and it’s unclear when a formal initiative might be announced and what shape it might take. Conservatives and scientists outside the administration who support the general idea of a climate science red team are also divided over exactly what form it should take and where it should be housed. (See related story.)”There’s been speculation that Pruitt and the White House have differences of opinion over how it should be launched and what part of the government should be in charge of it,” said a source close to the administration. The White House Trump team puts controversial ‘red team’ challenge to climate science ‘on hold’ Pruitt has not been given authorization to go ahead with red team, blue team; there are still many issues to be ironed out. Anonymous Trump administration official Editor’s note: A nice scoop today from E&E News’ Robin Bravender on the status of a proposal to have a “red team” composed of climate science critics challenge a “blue team” of mainstream researchers.Originally published by E&E NewsThe effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to publicly debate mainstream climate science is on ice. The idea of a “red team, blue team” debate to critique climate science — championed by EPA boss Scott Pruitt — has created divisions within the Trump administration, spurring high-level staff discussions at the White House about how to proceed. Earlier this week, EPA air chief Bill Wehrum attended a White House meeting with Trump energy aide Mike Catanzaro, deputy chief of staff Rick Dearborn and others to discuss the future of the debate, according to an administration official. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The White House center_img Pruitt frequently brings up the idea in interviews and has suggested the debate could air on television. But he typically steers clear of specifics.”So the red team, blue team approach … is something that puts experts in a room and lets them debate an issue,” Pruitt said on “Fox & Friends” in September. “The American people deserve that type of objective, transparent discussion.”He added: “We know the climate is always changing. We know humans contribute to it in some way. To what degree, to measure that with precision is very difficult. But what we don’t know: Are we in a situation where it’s an existential threat?”Asked yesterday about the status of a red team effort, EPA spokeswoman Liz Bowman said, “We will share updates if/when they become available.”Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2017. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Email By Robin Bravender, E&E NewsDec. 15, 2017 , 3:15 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Read more…last_img read more

Fields of fivestoryhigh ice blades could complicate landing on Jupiter moon

first_img Fields of five-story-high ice blades could complicate landing on Jupiter moon By Paul VoosenOct. 8, 2018 , 11:00 AM Email Scientists have long wanted to explore Jupiter’s frozen moon, Europa, which is home to a vast subsurface ocean that makes it a promising home for extraterrestrial life. Recently, that desire has gained prominent financial backing from the U.S. Congress, which has directed NASA to start to build a robotic lander to follow the Europa Clipper, which will chart the moon from above.But such a mission could be tricky. Probes have shown that Europa’s ice-bound surface is riven with fractures and ridges, and new work published today in Nature Geosciences suggests any robotic lander could face a nasty surprise, in the form of vast fields of ice spikes, each standing as tall as a semitruck is long.Such spikes are created on Earth in the frigid tropical peaks of the Andes Mountains, where they are called “penitentes,” for their resemblance to devout white-clad monks. First described by Charles Darwin, penitentes are sculpted by the sun in frozen regions that experience no melt; instead, the fixed patterns of light cause the ice to directly vaporize, amplifying minute surface variations that result in small hills and shadowed hollows. These dark hollows absorb more sunlight than the bright peaks around them, vaporizing down further in a feedback loop. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ESO Penitentes have already been seen on Pluto. And by calculating other competing erosional processes on Europa, such as impacts and charged particle bombardment, the new work suggests the vaporization of ice would be dominant in its equatorial belt, forming penitentes 15 meters tall spaced only 7 meters apart. Such formations could explain, the authors add, why radar observations of the planet dip in energy at its equator, the penitentes scattering the response. But the ultimate proof of whether Europa’s belly will be off limits to landing will come when the Clipper arrives in the mid-2020s.last_img read more

In this Sangrur town behind peculiar eyesores Captains minister his message

first_img Related News Congress renews bid for all-party Opposition alliance for Maharashtra assembly polls Post Comment(s) Best Of Express Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Asked how they allowed misuse of public property for political promotion, NHAI project director Vishal Gautam said he cannot answer the query.However, a senior NHAI official, requesting anonymity, said, “In this case, police should have taken action when flyover was defaced as NHAI has no magisterial powers. Police could have booked the offenders under the National Highways Act and the Punjab Prevention of Defacement of Property Act”.Section 3(1) of the Punjab Prevention of Defacement of Property Act calls for six months imprisonment and a fine of Rs 1,000 and makes it a cognizable offence. Written by Divya Goyal | Bhawanigarh (sangrur) | Updated: July 16, 2019 5:25:34 am BJP will make Maharashtra Congress-mukt, says party state chief Chandrakant Patil Advertisingcenter_img Sabka saath In this Sangrur town, behind peculiar eyesores: Captain’s minister, his message Painted faces of the Chief Minister Amarinder Singh and Cabinet minister Vijay Inder Singla on a wall painting at Bhawanigarh in Sangrur. (Express Photo by Gurmeet Singh)Created by a Congress leader to publicize the promise of right price for agriculture produce after the party assumed power in Punjab in 2017, several wall paintings – on public properties such as flyovers on the National Highway from Sangrur to Patiala via Bhawanigarh – have now turned into eyesores. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Reason: Faces of Chief Minister Capt Amarinder Singh and cabinet minister Vijay Inder Singla, painted alongside the message have been blacked out – with green paint.These wall paintings in Bhawanigarh, a part of Sangrur assembly constituency from where Singla is MLA, were covered with paint after the model code of conduct was imposed during recently concluded Lok Sabha polls.Singla confessed that he had got these paintings done to “motivate” the farmers after Congress came to power. “We got these paintings done to motivate the farmers and to discourage them from committing suicides. So the motivational slogans were also painted along. I did not misuse my position as then Public Works Department (PWD) minister. These were done before I took the charge as a minister”. Singla, who is now school education minister, further claimed that most such paintings were either removed or blacked out during Lok Sabha polls. Painted faces of Punjab CM Captain Amarinder Singh and his minister Vijay Inder Singla under a flyover on Patiala-Sangrur highway. (Express Photo by Gurmeet Singh)Singla claimed that aim “never was to deface the public property” in any way. “But when code of conduct was enforced, they had to be covered. At most locations, we got them removed entirely.”Sangrur Deputy Commissioner Ghanshyam Thori said that the National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) should answer how political paintings were allowed to be painted on the flyover. “We got most of them removed during LS polls and in some others, faces were painted as per rules. Many locations were repainted with graffitis related to voting. If some are left, we will see (that they are removed),” the DC said.Contacted PWD superintending engineer NP Singh too passed the buck onto the NHAI saying it was their property. Advertisinglast_img read more

Indonesian woman jailed for reporting sexual harassment to seek amnesty

first_imgBy Reuters |Jakarta | Published: July 8, 2019 8:39:56 pm Advertising The Supreme Court last week jailed Baiq Nuril Maknun, a former teacher from the island of Lombok, for six months for breaking a communications law, after she recorded lewd phone calls from the principal of the school she worked at and reported them to a colleague.Maknun, who is due to start serving her prison sentence next week, told reporters she would file for amnesty as soon as possible and she hoped the president would grant it. “As a child, who should I go to but a father,” said a softly spoken Maknun, 41, as she struggled to hold back tears.Indonesia is the world’s most populous Muslim country and is predominantly conservative. While some women have recounted experiences of sexual harassment as part of a #MeToo movement, in general, women are less likely to speak out about abuse compared with women in some other countries. Advertising Face of Indonesia disaster relief efforts dies at 49 Maknun had complained of getting lewd phone calls from the principal of the school where she worked from 2012, court documents showed. She secretly recorded some of the calls and gave a recording to a colleague, allegedly passing it on via an electronic device. But that opened her up to an accusation of spreading pornography under a communications law.Last week, the Supreme Court overturned a lower court’s decision to acquit her, imposed the jail term and also ordered her to pay a 500 million rupiah ($35,474) fine. Widodo, who was recently re-elected for a second term, has indicated he would pardon Maknun if she applied for amnesty, but he has also asked the public to honour the Supreme Court’s decision.Minister of Law and Human Rights Yasonna Laoly said women would not speak up if Maknun was not freed.“If she is not given an amnesty, there are tens of thousands of women, victims of sexual assault or harassment who won’t be brave enough to report it,” Laoly told reporters after meeting Maknun in Jakarta.The Supreme Court defended its verdict saying it was not asked to rule on sexual harassment allegations, but rather on whether or not Maknun had electronically disseminated pornographic content and violated the communications law. Undersea quake south of Indonesia’s Bali causes brief panic sexual harassment, Women harassment, Baiq Nuril Maknun, Baiq Nuril Maknun amnesty, Indonesia, sexual harassment, indonesian woman,Women harassment, Indonesia Women harassment Indonesia, indonesia news, World news, The Indian Express news Indonesia’s Law and Human Rights Minister Yasonna Laoly talks to journalists during a press conference with Baiq Nuril Maknun, a teacher on the island of Lombok who was jailed after she tried to report sexual harassment, in Jakarta, Indonesia, July 8. (Photo: Reuters)An Indonesian woman sentenced to prison for reporting her employer for sexual harassment said on Monday she will ask President Joko Widodo for an amnesty. Related News Strong quake causes panic in eastern Indonesia, tsunami warning lifted 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

7yrold boy drowns in Mumbai drain 3rd such death in a week

first_img Advertising In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief LiveMumbai building collapse LIVE UPDATES: 10 dead, several others feared trapped; CM orders probe Post Comment(s) Related News This is the third such death in a week in the metropolis.Divyansh, an 18-month-old boy, fell into an open gutter in suburban Goregaon on Wednesday night.BMC officials had called off the search 48 hours later after checkingover 10kilometres of the drain line in vain. On Monday, Dindoshi police filed a criminal case under section 304 A (causing death due to negligence) of the IPC against the officers and staff involved in supervision work of the drainage on the basis of a complaint filed by the child’s father Suraj Singh.Singh, talking to reporters during the operation, had accused the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and other forces of negligence during the search. Best Of Express Advertising Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook center_img Mumbai boy drowns, Mumbai boy drowns in Mumbai, Mumbai drowning, Minor boy drowns, Mumbai news, Indian Express news  The boy, Amit Munnalal Jaiswal, fell in the drain at the Rajiv Gandhi Colony in Dharavi, a sprawling slum colony in the heart of the city, an official said. (Representational)A seven-year-old boy died after falling into an open drain in Dharavi slum Monday, the third case of drowning of a minor in a week here, police said. The boy, Amit Munnalal Jaiswal, fell in the drain at the Rajiv Gandhi Colony in Dharavi, a sprawling slum colony in the heart of the city, an official said.The incident took place when Amit and his brother were playing near the drain, he said.After being alerted about the incident, the police rushed to the spot and pulled out the boy from the open drainage. He was rushed to Sion hospital, where he was declared brought dead, the official said. Mumbai: Bail after 7 years, man says said yes to LeT charge to avoid long trial NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Singh had claimed the civic body did nothing about the open gutter despite constant reminders from local residents. On Saturday, a 12-year-old boy died after falling into a water-filled pit, dug for the construction of the CoastalRoad, near Worli.The boy, Bablu Kumar Paswan, had fallen in the pit near the Worli Sea Link on Friday, the police said. By PTI |Mumbai | Published: July 15, 2019 9:50:41 pm Mumbai Mayor’s vehicle found in no-parking zone; fined last_img read more

Study reveals changes in functioning of older individuals central nervous system

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 26 2018The central nervous system of older individuals responds to movement and initiates muscular contraction differently compared to young individuals. This is the result of a study led by researcher Simon Walker at the University of Jyväskylä with Postdoctoral Researcher funding from the Academy of Finland. Walker’s team also found links between the ability to sense movement and balance control.The team performed a series of studies, testing healthy young (aged 35 and under) and older (aged 65‒75) individuals who did not regularly exercise. The results revealed changes in the functioning of the older individuals’ central nervous system.In the first study, the researchers rotated the test subjects’ both feet independently, up and down, with a specially built device and recorded brain signals using magnetoencephalography. They then analyzed the results with a technique known as coherence, comparing the amount of similarity between two signals, in this case the frequency of brain signals and the frequency of the foot movement. They found stronger coherence levels in the older participants. The coherence level was related to the amount of body sway during quiet standing.Related StoriesNew insights into molecular motors could help treat neurological disordersBotulinum toxin may offer relief from chronic pelvic pain in women with endometriosisSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds research”We interpret these findings to mean that those who require greater brain processing of movement have a compromised ability to sense movement. Therefore, they are not as efficient in controlling movement or standing,” Walker explains.In a separate study, Walker’s team investigated coherence between two thigh muscles during a voluntary contraction. Here, the older individuals showed lower coherence at several frequencies. According to Walker, this possibly means that older people cannot control their leg muscles as well as young people.Exercise was used to try to improve the functioning of the central nervous system. However, 14 weeks of resistance training did not change the level of coherence between the muscles of the older individuals during the contractions. “We don’t know yet if this is because this type of intervention doesn’t enhance central nervous system function, if the duration of the intervention wasn’t long enough, if the changes in the central nervous system of older people aren’t redeemable, or if it’s some combination of all these things,” Walker says.Both of these results occurred in apparently healthy older individuals. These people had a high physical function and good balance control. Nevertheless, they displayed a compromised central nervous system function.”Hence, there are probably other mechanisms that need to be enhanced to maintain the level of function. Also, it’s apparent that when older people need to produce force voluntarily, the electrical signals that control such movement are different compared to young people. Therefore, aging modifies not only the sensing of movement but also the execution of movement. We need to continue to design interventions and tests to determine whether these changes are reversible,” Walker says. Source:http://www.aka.fi/en/about-us/media/press-releases/2018/changes-in-older-peoples-central-nervous-system-leads-to-compromised-ability-to-sense-movement/last_img read more

Flavoring additive ingredients in ecigarettes may increase inflammation and impair lung function

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 11 2018Flavoring and additive ingredients in e-cigarettes may increase inflammation and impair lung function, according to new research. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, also found that short-term exposure to e-cigarettes was enough to cause lung inflammation similar or worse than that seen in traditional cigarette use. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for October.E-cigarettes, popular battery-powered devices that simulate the act of smoking a traditional cigarette, dispense a vapor derived from liquid chemicals in a refillable cartridge. The refills typically contain propylene glycol, nicotine and often flavorings. Propylene glycol–a colorless, odorless food additive–is found in numerous processed food and beverages; it is also used as a solvent in a number pharmaceuticals. E-cigarette devices and refills are not well regulated, and the long-term health effects of e-cigarette use are not widely known.Researchers studied several groups of mice that received whole-body exposure to varying chemical combinations four times each day. Each exposure session was separated by 30-minute smoke-free intervals. Related StoriesAcute exposure to flavored e-liquids exacerbates endothelial cell dysfunction, study findsNew regulations on e-cigarettes may have unintended consequencesStudy finds increase in cigarette smoking among minority teens after college affirmative action bansThe cigarette and e-cigarette groups were compared with a control group that was exposed to medical-grade air. Some of the animals in each group were exposed to short-term cigarette smoke or e-cigarette vapor (three days), while others were exposed for a longer term (four weeks).The research team found an increase in markers of inflammation, mucus production and altered lung function in the propylene, propylene + nicotine and flavoring groups after three days. However, the propylene group showed fewer negative effects with long-term exposure, suggesting the additive alone elicits only a temporary irritation that eventually subsides with continued use. In addition, two inflammation-producing proteins became elevated only in the flavoring group, suggesting that some of the many flavoring components on the market may not be safe for even short-term use.The condition of the e-cigarette groups in comparison with the cigarette group surprised the researchers. The level of oxidative stress–stress at a cellular level–in the flavoring group was equal to or higher than that of the cigarette group. However, respiratory mechanics were adversely affected only in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and not to e-cigarette vapor after prolonged treatment. “The observed detrimental effects in the lung upon [e-cigarette] vapor exposure in animal models highlight the need for further investigation of safety and toxicity of these rapidly expanding devices worldwide,” the researchers wrote.Source: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/2018/63.html One group was exposed to cigarette smoke (“cigarette”); One group was exposed to e-cigarette vapor containing propylene glycol and vegetable glycerol, an odorless liquid derived from plant oils (“propylene”); One group was exposed to e-cigarette vapor containing propylene glycol and nicotine (“propylene + nicotine”) and One group was exposed to e-cigarette vapor containing propylene glycol, nicotine and tobacco flavoring (“flavoring”).last_img read more

Researchers discover mechanisms that lead to osteoarthritis after knee joint injury

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 25 2018Knee joint injuries are typically related to sports, such as football, rugby or ice hockey, but people often do not know that such injuries may lead to joint inflammation and post-traumatic osteoarthritis. In advanced post-traumatic osteoarthritis, joint cartilage breaks down completely, causing severe joint pain, lack of mobility and even social isolation. However, the mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis are not known. Currently, it is not possible for a physician examining a patient to predict future joint condition and possible development of osteoarthritis. In the future, however, this may be possible, as a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Massachusetts Institute of Technology now shows that articular cartilage degenerates specifically around injury areas when the fluid flow velocity becomes excessive. The findings were reported in Scientific Reports.Related StoriesNew type of treatment for osteoarthritis shows promise for use in humansNew technology to harvest energy from the human kneeMortality risk from cardiovascular disease higher for people with osteoarthritisThe study presents a new mechanobiological model for cartilage degeneration by implementing tissue deformation and fluid flow as mechanisms for cartilage breakdown when a normal dynamic loading, such as walking, is applied to the joint. The results were compared to experimentally observed degradation of articular cartilage. Ultimately, the new model could be used to predict osteoarthritis in personal medicine, to suggest optimal rehabilitation protocols, and to improve the quality of life.The researchers found that different mechanisms, such as fluid flow and tissue deformation, can cause cartilage degradation after a knee injury. The results obtained using the novel algorithm agreed well with the experimentally observed proteoglycan content and cell death in cartilage samples. According to the researchers, a numerical analysis shows that both fluid flow and tissue deformation are plausible mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis, but increased fluid flow from cartilage seems to be better in line with the experiments.”Our findings indicate that after an injury in the knee and subsequent tissue loading, osteoarthritis is caused by easy leakage of proteoglycans through the injury surface by high fluid outflow,” Early Stage Researcher Gustavo A. Orozco from the University of Eastern Finland explains.The findings are significant, and could open up new avenues for the model to be employed in the prediction of subject-specific progression of post-traumatic osteoarthritis, and in the evaluation of the effect of clinical interventions in the future. Specifically, the model could identify high and low-risk lesions in the cartilage for osteoarthritis development and suggest an optimal and individual rehabilitation protocol. Source:http://www.uef.fi/-/tutkijat-loysivat-syyn-miksi-nivelvammat-johtavat-nivelrikkoonlast_img read more

Egg metabolites in blood linked to reduced risk of type 2 diabetes

first_imgJan 3 2019Consumption of one egg every day seems to associate with a blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study conducted in the University of Eastern Finland shows. The findings were published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. Although it is too early to draw any causal conclusions, we now have some hints about certain egg-related compounds that may have a role in type 2 diabetes development. Further detailed investigations with both cell models and intervention studies in humans that use modern techniques, such as metabolomics, are needed to understand the mechanisms behind physiological effects of egg intake.”Stefania Noerman Related StoriesSome people treated for type 1 diabetes may have monogenic diabetes, study findsAADE’s comprehensive guidance on care of children, young adults with diabetes releasedDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetesThe study found that the blood samples of men who ate more eggs included certain lipid molecules that positively correlated with the blood profile of men who remained free of type 2 diabetes. In addition, the researchers identified several biochemical compounds in blood that predicted a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, including the amino acid tyrosine.The study suggests some plausible mechanisms which could at least partly explain the inverse association between egg intake and the previously observed lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Source:http://www.uef.fi/-/kananmunan-aineenvaihduntatuotteilla-yhteys-pienempaan-diabetesriskiin?inheritRedirect=true&redirect=%2Fen%2Fetusivu The purpose of the current study was to explore potential compounds that could explain this association using non-targeted metabolomics, a technique that enables a broad profiling of chemicals in a sample.”Early Stage Researcher and lead author of the study Stefania Noerman from the University of Eastern Finland Eggs remain one of the most controversial food items. High intake of eggs has traditionally been discouraged, mainly due to their high cholesterol content. However, eggs are also a rich source of many bioactive compounds that can have beneficial effects on health. This means that the health effects of consuming eggs are difficult to determine based solely on their cholesterol content.The investigators have previously shown that eating roughly one egg per day was associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes among middle-aged men participating in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study in eastern Finland. Eating one egg every day seems to associate with a blood metabolite profile that is related to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.last_img read more

Discharged dismissed ERs often miss chance to set overdose survivors on better

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 15 2019The last time heroin landed Marissa Angerer in a Midland, Texas, emergency room — naked and unconscious — was May 2016. But that wasn’t her first drug-related interaction with the health system. Doctors had treated her a number of times before, either for alcohol poisoning or for ailments related to heavy drug use. Though her immediate, acute health issues were addressed in each episode, doctors and nurses never dealt with her underlying illness: addiction.Angerer, now 36 and in recovery, had been battling substance use disorder since she started drinking alcohol at age 16. She moved onto prescription pain medication after she broke her ankle and then eventually to street opiates like heroin and fentanyl.Just two months before that 2016 overdose, doctors replaced an infected heart valve, a byproduct of her drug use. She was discharged from the hospital and began using again the next day, leading to a reinfection that ultimately cost her all 10 toes and eight fingers.”[The hospital] didn’t have any programs or anything to go to,” Angerer said. “It’s nobody’s fault but my own, but it definitely would have been helpful if I didn’t get brushed off.”This scenario plays out in emergency departments across the country, where the next step — a means to divert addicted patients into treatment — remains elusive, creating a missed opportunity in the health system.A recent study of Medicaid claims in West Virginia, which has an opioid overdose rate more than three times the national average and the highest death rate from drug overdoses in the country, documented this disconnect.Researchers analyzed claims for 301 people who had nonfatal overdoses in 2014 and 2015. By examining hospital codes for opioid poisoning, researchers followed the patients’ treatment, seeing if they were billed in the following months for mental health visits, opioid counseling visits or prescriptions for psychiatric and substance abuse medications.They found that fewer than 10 percent of people in the study received, per month, medications like naltrexone or buprenorphine to treat their substance use disorder. (Methadone is another option to treat substance use, but it isn’t covered by West Virginia Medicaid and wasn’t included in the study.) In the month of the overdose, about 15 percent received mental health counseling. However, on average, in the year after the overdose, that number fell to fewer than 10 percent per month.”We expected more … especially given the national news about opioid abuse,” said Neel Koyawala, a second-year medical student at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, and the lead author on the study, which was published last month in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.It’s an opportunity that’s being missed in emergency rooms everywhere, said Andrew Kolodny, the co-director of Opioid Policy Research at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University outside Boston.Related StoriesResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patients”There’s a lot of evidence that we’re failing to take advantage of this low-hanging fruit with individuals who have experienced a nonfatal overdose,” Kolodny said. “We should be focusing resources on that population. We should be doing everything we can to get them plugged into treatment.”He compared it to someone who came into the emergency room with a heart attack. It’s taken for granted that the patient would leave with heart medication and a referral to a cardiac specialist. Similarly, he wants patients who come in with an overdose to start buprenorphine in the hospital and leave with a referral to other forms of treatment.Kolodny and Koyawala both noted that a lack of training and understanding among health professionals continues to undermine what happens after the overdose patient is stabilized.”Our colleagues in emergency rooms are not particularly well trained to be able to help people in a situation like this,” said Dr. Margaret Jarvis, the medical director of a residential addiction treatment center in Pennsylvania.It was clear, Angerer said, that her doctors were not equipped to deal with her addiction. They didn’t know, for instance, what she was talking about when she said she was “dope sick,” feeling ill while she was going through withdrawal.”They were completely unaware of so much, and it completely blew my mind,” she said.When she left the hospital after her toe and finger amputations, Angerer recalls her next stop seemed to be a tent city somewhere in Midland, where she feared she would end up dead. Instead, she persuaded her mother to drive her about 300 miles to a treatment facility in Dallas. She had found it on her own.”There were a lot of times I could have gone down a better path, and I fell through the cracks,” Angerer said.The bottom line, Jarvis said, is that when a patient comes into the emergency room with an overdose, they’re feeling sick, uncomfortable and “miserable.” But surviving that episode, she emphasized, doesn’t necessarily change their perilous condition.”Risk for overdose is just as high the day after as the day before an overdose,” said Dr. Matt Christiansen, an assistant professor in the Department of Family & Community Health at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine in West Virginia.last_img read more

Earlycareer job loss has long term health implications

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 20 2019Sociologists at the University of Bamberg analyze employment biographiesNumerous studies have suggested that job loss and unemployment lead to poorer health. Sociologists at the University of Bamberg are now continuing this research and have set out to answer whether job loss still has health-related consequences even if it occurred decades ago and subsequent employment may have been found. Jonas Voβemer and Professor Michael Gebel, Chair of Methods of Empirical Social Research at the University of Bamberg, have shown with their current research that involuntary loss of employment early in a person’s career has long term health implications. Even more than 30 years later, negative health impacts can be traced back to early-career job loss.Related StoriesBridging the Gaps to Advance Research in the Cannabis IndustryTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchOlympus launches next-generation X Line objectives for clinical, research applicationsFor their study, the researchers used data from the SHARELIFE survey which is the third wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). The transnational study interviewed approximately 28,000 Europeans over the age of 50 about their social and familial networks, health, and socio-economic status over the course of their lives. The analyses, carried out by Voβemer and Gebel in cooperation with Dr. Olena Nizalova of the University of Kent in England and Olga Nikolaieva of the Kyiv School of Economics in Ukraine, reveal that people who involuntarily lost their jobs within the first ten years of their professional lives were on average 6 percentage points more likely to rate their own health as fair or poor compared to those who had not experienced a loss of employment in the same phase, but had otherwise similar characteristics.The researchers were also able to show that the effects were the same for employees who were laid off and for those whose jobs were lost due to plant closures. This suggests that the data analyses could avoid the effects of confounding factors, because in the case of a plant closure, all employees are affected and it is less likely that the job loss could be explained by personal characteristics that would also affect health. So what conclusions can be drawn from these findings? Voβemer says, “Consistent with earlier studies, we have shown that losing a job and periods of unemployment have more than just financial consequences. Moreover, our study indicates that these consequences may be long lasting.” These findings, if replicated in future studies, suggest that policy makers should consider both health implications and their persistence when evaluating the costs of job loss and unemployment.The study is part of the international and interdisciplinary EXCEPT project (Social Exclusion of Youth in Europe: Cumulative Disadvantage, Coping Strategies, Effective Policies and Transfer) which received approximately 2.4 million euros in funding from the European Union. Source:https://www.uni-bamberg.de/en/last_img read more

Targeted treatment offers symptom relief for patients with psychosis

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 3 2019Treatment for individuals who experience psychosis, such as hallucinations and delusions as a result of a psychiatric illness, can be targeted to a specific structural mutation, according to a study published by researchers from McLean Hospital and other institutions in the journal Biological Psychiatry.The study was led by Deborah L. Levy, PhD, director of the Psychology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital, the largest psychiatric affiliate of Harvard Medical School. The research provides a proof-of-principle demonstration of symptom relief by targeting a specific genotype and links an individual structural mutation to the pathophysiology of psychosis and treatment response.In the last decade, significant progress has been made in identifying genetic factors underlying schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other psychiatric disorders. Hundreds if not thousands of common genetic variants are collective risk factors for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, the impact of each individual variant is both very small and indecisive in determining risk.Rare genetic variants, on the other hand, can have large effects on risk. These variants are thus assumed to impact core pathophysiological processes.Large-effect mutations are individually rare, with even the most recurrent impacting relatively few individuals. Some are so rare that they are private mutations, known to occur in only one or a few families, as is the mutation described by Levy and her colleagues.Levy’s study describes a variant that is characterized by an increase in the number of copies of specific genes (i.e., a copy number variant or CNV). In this case, is effectively due to the presence of a small extra chromosome. This CNV includes the gene encoding the enzyme glycine decarboxylase (GLDC). “The compelling aspect is that this CNV can be linked to pathophysiology, and, as the new study shows, to treatment,” said Levy.GLDC breaks down glycine, which is a co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, a type of excitatory glutamate receptor. The patients in this study have four, instead of the usual two, copies of the GLDC gene. Source:McLean Hospital We thus predicted that they would have increased glycine breakdown and thus less glycine available at the glycine modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. This results in NMDA receptor hypofunction.”Uwe Rudolph, MD, former director of the Laboratory of Genetic Neuropharmacology at McLean Hospital The present study illustrates that targeting structural genetic variants is a promising approach but because these variants are individually rare, most studies will have very small sample sizes, complicating the usual approach to statistical analysis.” Nevertheless, she said, “Because the effects of a targeted treatment can be large, it is important to prioritize opportunities to study even small groups of patients who may benefit.” NMDA receptor hypofunction has long been considered an important factor in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Variants in genes associated with NMDA receptor function are overrepresented in schizophrenia.According to Levy, the presence of an increased number of copies of GLDC raised the question of whether this CNV is medically actionable in individuals with this mutation.Related Stories$10 million endowed gift supports psychosis research effortsGeorgia researcher receives grant to develop models to better predict mental health disordersResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new study”Starting with individual carriers of the mutation, meaning using a ‘genotype-first’ approach, we sought to determine whether the predicted reduced glycine availability attributable to the increased copy number could be potentially normalized with agents that increase glycine or D-serine availability,” explained Levy. “This approach contrasts with the usual standard clinical practice of treating individuals on the basis of clinical symptoms or diagnosis independent of specific genetic variants.”Participants in the study had four identical copies of the GLDC gene. The authors showed that supplementation of standard psychotropic agents (including clozapine) with glycine or D-cycloserine (a partial selective agonist at the NMDA receptor) resulted in improvement in clinical symptoms. The researchers provided two independent proof-of-principle demonstrations of symptom relief by targeting this specific genotype.Notably, the same rare mutation occurred here in different clinical disorders (schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder with psychotic features). This suggest that treatment response was determined by the targeted mutation independently of clinical diagnosis.”It is important to note that the two subjects studied here bore little clinical resemblance, with distinctly different symptom burdens, and highly dissimilar courses of illness,” noted J. Alexander Bodkin, MD. Bodkin, the director of the Clinical Psychopharmacology Research Program at McLean, oversaw psychiatric care of both subjects throughout the blinded and open-label trials of glycine and d-cycloserine.”The findings may implicate a ‘molecular subtype’ that may respond to treatments that normalize dysregulation of the glutamatergic system” said Levy, “Specifically, carriers of other related mutations may potentially benefit from low-dose D-cycloserine as well. If it becomes possible one day to identify patients with such molecular subtypes in clinical practice, studies could be conducted that would potentially make targeted treatment approaches available to a larger group of patients.”Moreover, one of the study’s authors, Charity J. Morgan, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham, stated:last_img read more