Go back to the enewsletter Korea Tourism Organi

first_imgGo back to the e-newsletter >Korea Tourism Organization has launched a global tourism campaign ‘Write Your Name in Korea’ which will run until the end of 2015. The campaign aims to enhance the image of Korea as a tourist destination, inviting all who love Korea and wish to visit Korea one day to participate in the campaign.The campaign features ‘Sang Sang Gil’ (meaning “imagination road” in Korean), located in the city of Changwon on the southern coast of Korea.The campaign consists of 2 major promotions, the first of which runs until 30 September 2015 at www.imagineyourkorea.com/write-your-name.The first 23,000 applicants who successfully submit their name and nationality will be selected to have their names displayed on ‘Sang Sang Gil’. Among the applicants, one person per week, a total of 6 people will be randomly selected and granted an opportunity to visit Korea. The winner and 1 companion will be awarded round-trip air tickets to Korea, 3 nights’ accommodation and a 1-day tour of ‘Sang Sang Gil’ in Changwon.In addition, if applicants of the above event visit ‘Sang Sang Gil’, they can receive special gifts and enjoy a free ride on the Changwon City Tour Bus. This promotion ends 31 December 2015.Go back to the e-newsletter >last_img read more

UK telco TalkTalk has signed up 29000 YouView cus

first_imgUK telco TalkTalk has signed up 29,000 YouView customers since launching the connected TV platform at the end of September.Although that figure includes trialists, a TalkTalk spokesperson said the majority were paying customers. Engineers are connecting new YouView customers at a rate of 1,000 per day, he added.TalkTalk Plus customers can receive a YouView box free-of-charge, giving them access to 74 Freeview channels, 5,000 on-demand titles and a seven-day catch-up service. TalkTalk Plus costs £14.50 (€18.50) per month, plus £9.50 line-rental. At the end of September, the telco had 1,097,000 TalkTalk Plus customers, a 44% increase year-on-year.“We have successfully launched our TV proposition and have installed 29,000 customers to date. Customer feedback has been positive and we are growing the base according to plan, at 1,000 per day,” said CEO Dido Harding.TalkTalk invested £2 million in the YouView venture during the six months ending September 30, having spent an additional £6 million during the preceding 12 months.Rival telco BT also offers YouView boxes to its subscribers, launching the service last month. It has yet to release subscriber numbers.last_img read more

Belarusian telco Beltelecom has added two packages

first_imgBelarusian telco Beltelecom has added two packages from Russian content providers Amedia and NTV+ to its Zala TV offering.The Amedia package includes channels Amedia, Amedia 2, Amedia Premium and Amedia HIT, while the NTV+ package includes Nashe Kino, Kino, Kino 2 and Premiera.Amedia provides a range of international movies, while Amedia 2 focuses on Russian TV series and movies. Amedia Premium delivers new content from HBO, Showtime, CBS, Warner Bros, ABC Studios and the BBC.Nashe Kino focuses on Soviet-era movies, while Kino provides a range of popular movies and Kino 2 provides a choice of international movies and Premiera offers a choice of recent releases.last_img read more

Gary Davey Sky has started producing 360degree vi

first_imgGary DaveySky has started producing 360-degree videos and will use Facebook as a distribution platform for this content, according to Sky’s MD of content Gary Davey.Speaking at a Royal Television Society event in London last night, Davey said that Sky has started producing some “really interesting” Virtual Reality (VR) content and filmed something “just the other day” in a refugee camp in Lebanon. This follows its investment last year in VR firm Jaunt.He said this immersive content will be available first on Facebook, which started to roll out 360-degree videos in the service’s News Feed in September, and that in time Sky 360-degree content will also be available on VR headsets.Davey also revealed that Sky News would go through major changes this year, with the closure of its current newsroom and a move to a new facility.“Sky News will move into a purpose-built, state-of-art, digital newsroom. We’ve got a completely new design, completely new workflows, an opportunity to rethink the whole idea – how should news function in the modern world with mobile phones and so on. It’s a really interesting time,” said Davey.In a wide-ranging talk and question-and-answer session, Davey confirmed Sky’s plans to launch an Ultra High Definition service, which will be supported by its new, advanced Sky Q offering.He said this UHD offering will include a “wide range of content including high-end documentary material, live sports, premier movies” though would not say when this would launch.He also dismissed the idea that Sky was cutting programming budgets due to the costs incurred in renewing its Premier League Football rights. “This year we’ll spend about £5 billion on content – which clearly includes sports and entertainment,” said Davey. “Our entertainment budgets are growing at a faster rate than they ever have in the history of the business.”In terms of content consumption, Davey said that Sky now thinks in terms of brands, not channels, having embraced a range of distribution models – including its stand-alone over-the-top service, Now TV.“We don’t care when, where or on what device the customer consumes the content. We just want the customer engaged in the content,” said Davey, revealing that just 16% of the total consumption of its recently-launched original drama, The Last Panthers, was through live liner.He also dismissed competition from new rivals like Amazon and Netflix, claiming that Sky “kicked this journey off” way before either company “became an issue”.“The truth is that Netflix has been very successful in the UK at a time when we’re growing as fast as we’ve ever grown and our churn rate is at the lowest level it’s been in 10 years. So the existence of Netflix doesn’t seem to have damaged our customer base at all. It’s a supplementary service to people,” said Davey.Sky upped it investment in cinematic VR firm Jaunt in September, as part of a US$65 million (€58 million) funding round that was led by Disney and also had contribution from ProSiebenSat.1.A month later Sky News has launched its first virtual reality news report on the migrant crisis in Europe, filmed on “the front line of Europe’s migration crisis in Greece.” The report was filmed with the Jaunt ONE VR camera.last_img read more

Dear Readers We are just back from the Recovery R

first_imgDear Readers,We are just back from the Recovery Reality Check Summit, which was very informative as well as thought-provoking. We took some time while there to chat with a few of our speakers after their presentations and will be sharing them here over the next few weeks.Our first conversation is with Rick Rule, the legendary resource speculator. He gives us a powerful primer on being a contrarian speculator, which may help bolster some discipline in the current market climate. We hope you enjoy this presentation.Sincerely,Louis James Senior Metals Investment Strategist Casey Researchlast_img read more

Over 50000 People Signed up for the Marijuana Mil

first_imgOver 50,000 People Signed up for the Marijuana Millionaire Summit… Recommended Link Justin: I agree. Let’s start with money launderer. Doug: Money laundering. It’s the process of making money obtained from criminal activity look like it came from a legitimate source. But it’s a completely artificial crime. It’s made up. It was created out of whole cloth about 40 years ago, as I recall. Like most “crimes” today, it’s not wrong in itself; it’s wrong because some legislators passed a law. There’s nothing wrong, in principle, with money laundering. Perhaps you got the money illegally or immorally. And, incidentally, those are two totally different concepts, where there’s only an accidental overlap. But that’s a big subject for a whole new conversation. But what’s wrong with redeploying capital that already exists in a perfectly legal or moral way? I would say nothing. Money is fungible. It’s not like artwork—it’s not so easy to trace its provenance. Anyway, it’s said that most great fortunes started with a crime. That’s certainly true for the Kennedy fortune. Joe Kennedy, founder of the clan, made most of his money bootlegging, which is the equivalent of drug dealing. He also made money with stock manipulation, which is insider trading. God knows what else he was up to. Although bootlegging and stock manipulation are not, in themselves, immoral. That said, I have no doubt many other things—like murder, assault, theft—occurred in the process. So, he laundered money. It wasn’t a crime then. It’s counterproductive to make it illegal to take these so-called ill-gotten gains, and do something correct with them. It’s just another Kafka-esque crime that they can arbitrarily use to hang you. At what point does capital created illegally become clean? Money laundering is a non-crime, and shouldn’t be treated as a crime. Justin: What about drug dealers? Doug: Today, drug dealers are automatically seen as the worst kind of scum. Drug dealers now are always looked upon as being violent, evil, immoral, amoral, just horrible human beings. But the problem isn’t so much that drugs can be abused and harm the user—that’s true of alcohol, tobacco, food, sex, inactivity, and a hundred other things. The problem arises when they’re made illegal. All drugs should be legal. Why? Well, your body is your primary possession. If you can’t control what you can put in your own body, you have no freedom at all. You’re, in effect, a slave. That’s the moral argument for drugs being legal. Whether they’re good, bad, or indifferent is a technical issue. But it’s a question of degree, as is the case with food, sex, alcohol, tobacco, sugar, and everything else. These can all be addictive or even dangerous if they’re not used in moderation. The “War on Drugs” is foolish and destructive on every level. It should be abolished. Justin: You explored this idea in your latest novel, Drug Lord. Doug: Yes. In that novel, my co-author John Hunt and I tried to reform the unjustly besmirched occupation of drug lord. Our drug lord hero, Charles Knight, is a thoroughly good guy. There’s nothing wrong with the commodity. There’s nothing wrong with purveying drugs. But, as with the other subjects we’re discussing, people often have a fixed idea burned into their consciousness, and they’re unwilling or unable to analyze the subject rationally. Drug dealing, whether you’re a ghetto dweller or Big Pharma, is—in itself—a non-crime. Justin: But Doug, drug dealers murder, kidnap people, and do all sorts of horrible things. How can you say they’re not criminals? Doug: That’s true. But it’s not because they’re drug dealers. It’s because they’re murderers, kidnappers, or extortionists. Those are the real crimes. But you’ve got to separate these ideas. Something may look gray. But gray is a combination of black and white. It shows a lack of critical thinking when people can’t separate them. Justin’s note: Tomorrow, I’ll share part two of this interview, where Doug shares his thoughts on two other controversial buzzwords. In the meantime, if you haven’t already, I encourage you to pick up a copy of Doug’s novel Drug Lord. It’s a fantastic tale where hero Charles Knight has to sort through the legal and illegal, moral and immoral, and right and wrong as he navigates the War on Drugs and the corrupt pharmaceutical industry. You can order your copy right here. Reader Mailbag Today, readers respond to our recent Dispatch, “Why Sessions Can’t Stop This Marijuana Boom”: Justin, awesome article. Where did you learn to write like this? You give the facts in a very appealing yet appalling manner! Hats off to you!—Lois Your reasoning is incorrect. The US Constitution governs his actions, and it is clearly worded otherwise against Sessions. Read the history of the 10th Amendment (and there is plenty from before that amendment was ratified in in September 1787). Generally, the 10th Amendment gives states the rights to overrule and supersede government foolery (Sessions included). Past SCOTUS cases will confirm the above information. The above are viable facts, and anecdotal bloviating.—CraigWhat do you think about Sessions’ fight against the marijuana industry? Let us know right here. In Case You Missed It… Did you attend Doug Casey’s free online investing summit last night? Thousands of readers discovered how Doug turned $50,000 into $1 million by investing in one marijuana penny stock. Readers also had the chance to discover the five best plays for the coming legal marijuana boom. If you missed the event, don’t worry. Doug has agreed to host a replay. Catch it right here. And discovered the details of the top 5 pot stocks for 2018. You have until midnight tonight to watch a free replay of the Summit. Click here to watch. Recommended Link — Delbert made $151,000 from Teeka Tiwari’s crypto plays, here’s his letter: I am a 67-year-old retired school teacher and small business owner from Greencastle, PA… When Teeka began providing information on the cryptocurrencies, I was intrigued. I bought a $5,400 stake in October 2016. This morning it was $74,200!!!! As a follow-up, within a few more weeks my stake had climbed to over $151,000… $5,400 to $151,000 in 8 months!!!!!! Here’s how to get Teeka’s research right away… Justin’s note: Doug Casey isn’t afraid to speak his mind… even if it means offending people. That’s a rare commodity. These days, most people only think what they’re supposed to think. They say only what’s politically correct. It’s a serious problem that’s getting worse every day. So, I recently called Doug to discuss some of today’s most controversial buzzwords… Justin: Doug, you said something during one of our recent talks that intrigued me: They’ll say if you use bitcoin you’re a money launderer, a drug dealer, a terrorist, or a tax evader. Actually, the morality involved in all those activities is worth a separate discussion… it’s perverse they’re always classed together. What did you mean by that? What’s wrong with grouping these people together? Doug: It’s chimpanzee think. It’s group-think memes in action. Somebody in a position of authority—or even just an actor, or a news reader, or a rapper, for that matter—says something. That transforms it into something that everybody automatically believes in, thoughtlessly. It’s like the concept of political correctness. I first heard that term on Saturday Night Live in the early 1980s. They said “this isn’t very politically correct.” I thought it was part of their skit. I thought it was a joke. — Little did I know that it would become a meme. The concept didn’t just catch on in society, it’s come to rule it. You’re supposed to be politically correct—if not, you must be a Nazi or a Klansman. Although, oddly, you might actually be a Communist or a fanatic Muslim with identical beliefs—and that’s somehow acceptable. So, the concept of PC isn’t a joke anymore. It’s the complete opposite of a joke. It’s a threat. Calling something a name that’s not just inaccurate, but maybe the opposite of what it is, is dangerous, dishonest and destructive. A lot of words are consistently misused today. Sometimes purposefully, sometimes just stupidly. What you say reflects what you think. And what you think—or at least feel—influences what you do. I did an article a while ago debunking the misuse of a dozen common words. People who think in slogans and catchphrases are very dangerous. They turn their feelings into group moral memes. Lowest common denominator stuff. Justin: They aren’t thinking for themselves. Doug: Exactly. That’s how lynch mobs work—“Give us Barabbas! Give us Barabbas!” People should analyze these “hot button” concepts, like the four things I mentioned—and there are lots of others—on their own merits. Otherwise you’ll wind up mindlessly parroting Paul Krugman, Hillary Clinton, or Kim Kardashian. These terms shouldn’t be grouped together. “These are evil things. We shouldn’t even think about them. They’re not even worth talking about.” Did Big Brother call them Badthink in 1984? Justin: But you think they’re worth talking about? Doug: Absolutely. This is what made Walter Block’s book Defending the Undefendable such a work of genius. Everyone should read it. It’s also very funny, somewhat in the tradition of George Carlin, another genius. So, yes. We should dissect all four terms that I mentioned.last_img read more

Elon Musks Boring Company to Prioritize Pedestrians Over Cars

first_img Richard Lawler Elon Musk’s Boring Company to Prioritize Pedestrians Over Cars A new concept video focuses on shuttles for people and bikes. Next Article –shares Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business 2 min read Image credit: Elon Musk | Twitter While we ponder the state of hyperloop tunnel transportation, Elon Musk just updated the plan for The Boring Company. The tech exec tweeted out a new concept video that focuses on a shuttle instead of cars. The shuttle (seen briefly in the first Boring Company video) is intended to carry people and bikes, and Musk said that Boring Company’s loop network would have “1000’s of small stations the size of a single parking space.”Adjusting The Boring Company plan: all tunnels & Hyperloop will prioritize pedestrians & cyclists over cars— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 9, 2018Boring Co urban loop system would have 1000’s of small stations the size of a single parking space that take you very close to your destination & blend seamlessly into the fabric of a city, rather than a small number of big stations like a subway— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 9, 2018That way they could blend into a city and bring riders directly to their destination, instead of a subway-sized stop further away. Additionally, he tweeted that “all tunnels & Hyperloop will prioritize pedestrians & cyclists over cars.” While cars will still be in the mix, the current promise is that they’ll have to wait for personalized mass transit needs, possibly encouraging people to ditch space and energy-hogging autos to opt for transportation that benefits everyone.Better video coming soon, but it would look a bit like this: pic.twitter.com/C0iJPi8b4U— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) March 9, 2018 Elon Musk March 12, 2018 Add to Queue Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. This story originally appeared on Engadget Register Now »last_img read more

Flavoring additive ingredients in ecigarettes may increase inflammation and impair lung function

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 11 2018Flavoring and additive ingredients in e-cigarettes may increase inflammation and impair lung function, according to new research. The study, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology, also found that short-term exposure to e-cigarettes was enough to cause lung inflammation similar or worse than that seen in traditional cigarette use. The research was chosen as an APSselect article for October.E-cigarettes, popular battery-powered devices that simulate the act of smoking a traditional cigarette, dispense a vapor derived from liquid chemicals in a refillable cartridge. The refills typically contain propylene glycol, nicotine and often flavorings. Propylene glycol–a colorless, odorless food additive–is found in numerous processed food and beverages; it is also used as a solvent in a number pharmaceuticals. E-cigarette devices and refills are not well regulated, and the long-term health effects of e-cigarette use are not widely known.Researchers studied several groups of mice that received whole-body exposure to varying chemical combinations four times each day. Each exposure session was separated by 30-minute smoke-free intervals. Related StoriesAcute exposure to flavored e-liquids exacerbates endothelial cell dysfunction, study findsNew regulations on e-cigarettes may have unintended consequencesStudy finds increase in cigarette smoking among minority teens after college affirmative action bansThe cigarette and e-cigarette groups were compared with a control group that was exposed to medical-grade air. Some of the animals in each group were exposed to short-term cigarette smoke or e-cigarette vapor (three days), while others were exposed for a longer term (four weeks).The research team found an increase in markers of inflammation, mucus production and altered lung function in the propylene, propylene + nicotine and flavoring groups after three days. However, the propylene group showed fewer negative effects with long-term exposure, suggesting the additive alone elicits only a temporary irritation that eventually subsides with continued use. In addition, two inflammation-producing proteins became elevated only in the flavoring group, suggesting that some of the many flavoring components on the market may not be safe for even short-term use.The condition of the e-cigarette groups in comparison with the cigarette group surprised the researchers. The level of oxidative stress–stress at a cellular level–in the flavoring group was equal to or higher than that of the cigarette group. However, respiratory mechanics were adversely affected only in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and not to e-cigarette vapor after prolonged treatment. “The observed detrimental effects in the lung upon [e-cigarette] vapor exposure in animal models highlight the need for further investigation of safety and toxicity of these rapidly expanding devices worldwide,” the researchers wrote.Source: http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/2018/63.html One group was exposed to cigarette smoke (“cigarette”); One group was exposed to e-cigarette vapor containing propylene glycol and vegetable glycerol, an odorless liquid derived from plant oils (“propylene”); One group was exposed to e-cigarette vapor containing propylene glycol and nicotine (“propylene + nicotine”) and One group was exposed to e-cigarette vapor containing propylene glycol, nicotine and tobacco flavoring (“flavoring”).last_img read more

Researchers discover mechanisms that lead to osteoarthritis after knee joint injury

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 25 2018Knee joint injuries are typically related to sports, such as football, rugby or ice hockey, but people often do not know that such injuries may lead to joint inflammation and post-traumatic osteoarthritis. In advanced post-traumatic osteoarthritis, joint cartilage breaks down completely, causing severe joint pain, lack of mobility and even social isolation. However, the mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis are not known. Currently, it is not possible for a physician examining a patient to predict future joint condition and possible development of osteoarthritis. In the future, however, this may be possible, as a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Massachusetts Institute of Technology now shows that articular cartilage degenerates specifically around injury areas when the fluid flow velocity becomes excessive. The findings were reported in Scientific Reports.Related StoriesNew type of treatment for osteoarthritis shows promise for use in humansNew technology to harvest energy from the human kneeMortality risk from cardiovascular disease higher for people with osteoarthritisThe study presents a new mechanobiological model for cartilage degeneration by implementing tissue deformation and fluid flow as mechanisms for cartilage breakdown when a normal dynamic loading, such as walking, is applied to the joint. The results were compared to experimentally observed degradation of articular cartilage. Ultimately, the new model could be used to predict osteoarthritis in personal medicine, to suggest optimal rehabilitation protocols, and to improve the quality of life.The researchers found that different mechanisms, such as fluid flow and tissue deformation, can cause cartilage degradation after a knee injury. The results obtained using the novel algorithm agreed well with the experimentally observed proteoglycan content and cell death in cartilage samples. According to the researchers, a numerical analysis shows that both fluid flow and tissue deformation are plausible mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis, but increased fluid flow from cartilage seems to be better in line with the experiments.”Our findings indicate that after an injury in the knee and subsequent tissue loading, osteoarthritis is caused by easy leakage of proteoglycans through the injury surface by high fluid outflow,” Early Stage Researcher Gustavo A. Orozco from the University of Eastern Finland explains.The findings are significant, and could open up new avenues for the model to be employed in the prediction of subject-specific progression of post-traumatic osteoarthritis, and in the evaluation of the effect of clinical interventions in the future. Specifically, the model could identify high and low-risk lesions in the cartilage for osteoarthritis development and suggest an optimal and individual rehabilitation protocol. Source:http://www.uef.fi/-/tutkijat-loysivat-syyn-miksi-nivelvammat-johtavat-nivelrikkoonlast_img read more

Facebook says Chinese phone makers got access to data Update

first_imgThe Huawei logo is seen in a shop in Shanghai on May 3, 2018; The Chinese phone maker was able to access Facebook data to get the leading social network’s applications to perform on its devices Huawei was able to access Facebook data to get the leading social network’s applications to perform on smartphones, according to the California-based company.”Facebook along with many other US tech companies have worked with them and other Chinese manufacturers to integrate their services onto these phones,” Facebook mobile partnerships leader Francisco Varela said in a statement.”Given the interest from Congress, we wanted to make clear that all the information from these integrations with Huawei was stored on the device, not on Huawei’s servers.”Facebook also had data access deals with Lenovo, OPPO and TCL of China, according to Varela.”Facebook’s integrations with Huawei, Lenovo, OPPO and TCL were controlled from the get go,” Varela said.Huawei has long disputed any links to the Chinese government, while noting that its infrastructure and computing products are used in 170 countries.”Concerns about Huawei aren’t new,” US Senator Mark Warner, vice chairman of the senate select committee on intelligence, said Tuesday.”I look forward to learning more about how Facebook ensured that information about their users was not sent to Chinese servers.”Contracts with phone makers placed tight limits on what could be done with data, and “approved experiences” were reviewed by engineers and managers before being deployed, according to the social network.Facebook said that it does not know of any privacy abuse by cellphone makers who years ago were able to gain access to personal data on users and their friends.Done with dealsBefore now-ubiquitous apps standardized the social media experience on smartphones, some 60 device makers like Amazon, Apple, Blackberry, HTC, Microsoft and Samsung worked with Facebook to adapt interfaces for the Facebook website to their own phones, the company said.Facebook is winding up the interface arrangements with device makers as the company’s smartphone apps dominate the service. The integration partnership with Huawei will terminate by the end of this week, according to the social network.The social media leader said it “disagreed” with the conclusions of a New York Times report that found that the device makers could access information on Facebook users’ friends without their explicit consent.But the report raised concerns that massive databases on users and their friends—including personal data and photographs—could be in the hands of device makers.Huawei maintains that its products “meet the highest standards of security, privacy and engineering in every country we operate,” and that “no government has ever asked us to compromise the security or integrity of any of our networks or devices.”The social network came under attack early this year over British political consultant Cambridge Analytica’s harvesting of personal data on 87 million Facebook users and their friends.Cambridge Analytica obtained the data without Facebook’s permission and used it to help the election campaign of US President Donald Trump.In April, Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg apologized in Congress over the Cambridge Analytica fiasco, amid rising calls for more regulation of the company. © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. China’s Huawei says to keep investing in US despite setbackcenter_img Facebook on Tuesday confirmed that a Chinese phone maker deemed a national security threat by the US was among companies given access to data on users. Citation: Facebook says Chinese phone makers got access to data (Update) (2018, June 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-facebook-user-chinese-handset-makers.html Explore furtherlast_img read more

Not a social media influencer You can still get paid

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Not a social media influencer? You can still get paid (2018, September 27) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-social-media-paid.html Glazier says it shouldn’t be so hard to make money from your recommendations. And you shouldn’t have to be internet-famous to get paid when you directly encourage a sale, he says.”You don’t have to be an influencer to have influence,” Glazier said.HOW IT WORKSAnyone can download the Wildlink app for free (available on Android, iOS, or as a software download for your computer). It runs in the background while you go about your business. Then, let’s say you post a picture of yourself on Facebook, and a friend replies, “I love your dress. Where did you buy it?” If you reply with a link to the dress on Nordstrom’s website, then Wildlink’s app will convert that URL to a trackable link. If your friend follows that link and eventually purchases the item, you get a commission that’s paid to a virtual wallet.Once a month, you can cash out your Wildlink commissions to your PayPal account.The company, which is working out of the Connect coworking space in University City, has built several ways to make this process seamless for the user. For example, once you download the app, its technology is built into your cell phone’s keyboard. The software can then guess when you’re typing a brand name, product, or service. Once you type out the word “REI,” for example, the software gives you an option to insert a link to REI directly from your keyboard.WHAT ABOUT PRIVACY?Warning bells may be ringing for the privacy-conscious. Will Wildfire now be reading my text messages, emails, and social media posts? Glazier says no. The software runs on your device, and it’s only searching for brands that match with its database of merchants. And the user always has the option of generating a link or ignoring the software’s suggestion.But Wildfire may have to deal with other concerns. For example, will a friend’s recommendation lose its power of influence if it’s known that they’re making a commission off the recommendation?Miro Copic, a marketing professor at San Diego State University, says there’s a big transition going on in the influencer space in which fans want transparency from the influencers they follow about their economic incentives.. Fans and followers want those individuals to be transparent about the economic incentives they’re getting to pitch a product.”The nuance here is disclosure,” Copic said. “Not that your friend won’t be your friend anymore, but they might question your motives if they find out you’re being compensated for your suggestions.”Malcolm Bohm, CEO at a company called Liquid Grids in San Diego, has been working in a similar space for years. His company also uses natural language processing to understand what internet users are saying on health forums, and how it relates to brands.Bohm says Wildfire could be onto something big, but it’s critical that they maintain transparency along the way”At the grassroots level, this could be disruptive in terms of how brands get recommendations,” Bohm said. “As long as they maintain authenticity, it could be really positive.”Glazier said Wildlink asks users to disclose this information themselves, notifying friends and family that they might be compensated for their recommendations.”In our terms of service we require that people follow the guidelines, but it’s really up to them to do so,” Glazier said.NEXT STEPSWildfire has received $2 million in seed money, led by Santa Monica-based investor group Mucker Capital in 2017. The company plans to raise another round of financing this fall, and will use those funds to expand its marketing and business development team in San Diego. Don’t try to make money off my online behavior—unless, of course, I get a commission. ©2018 The San Diego Union-Tribune Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.center_img A new app pays you for product recommendations Explore further That’s the idea behind San Diego tech startup Wildfire Systems, which is launching an app to help internet users make money off of conversations they’re already having online. The local company, founded by a former eBay executive, lets users earn commissions from recommendations they share on the Internet, whether it’s on social media, by email, or through text messaging apps.If, for example, a friend buys an Instant Pot after you raved about the pressure cooker on Instagram, then this startup’s software would let you get a cut of the sale.The idea is particularly timely considering the public outcry against tech giants like Facebook, who’ve been lambasted in recent months for making money off their users’ activity and personal data.Now, merchants are tripping over themselves to sign onto Wildfire’s platform, which already has 20,000 retailers on board, including giants like Expedia, Nordstrom’s, REI, and Walmart.The quick adoption may have something to do with the startup’s CEO, Jordan Glazier, who founded Wildfire Systems last year. Glazier is best known locally for leading a San Diego company called Eventful, which gained some fame a few years ago as the first global events calendar online. He grew that company to more than 25 million users before selling it to CBS in 2014. Before that, he was an early employee at eBay, where he helped transform the company from a collectibles website to the e-commerce giant it is today.WE’RE ALL INFLUENCERS?Glazier’s new app, Wildlink, brings to mind the marketing tactics that bloggers and other folks of online fame use, in which they get kickbacks from brands for pitching products online.In the industry, this is called “affiliate marketing,” and it’s a tool mostly used by people who have large followings on social media (collectively known as “influencers”). But it’s not so easy to make money this way. People have to sign up for individual affiliate marketing programs depending on the brand or retailer and then jump through hoops for each one before they can start earning cash.last_img read more

The Marshall Islands Are 10 Times More Radioactive Than Chernobyl

first_img Originally published on Live Science. The researchers tested coconuts and pandanus fruit (shown here) for radioactivity on 11 of the islands. Credit: Shutterstock 10 Times HBO’s ‘Chernobyl’ Got the Science Wrong In Photos: World’s 10 Most Polluted Places In Photos: Fukushima Butterflies Plagued With Defects Some of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean — such as the Bikini and Enewetak atolls — are still more radioactive than Chernobyl and Fukushima, even though more than 60 years have passed since the United States tested radioactive weapons on those islands, a new study finds. When testing the soil for plutonium-239 and -240, the researchers found that some of the islands had levels that were between 10 and 1,000 times higher than those on Fukushima (where an earthquake and tsunami led to the meltdown of nuclear reactors) and about 10 times higher than levels in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. The researchers took only a limited number of soil samples, meaning a more comprehensive survey is needed, they said. Regardless, they were surprised that neither national governments nor international organizations had “any further guidance on permissible plutonium levels in the soil,” even though levels in the Marshall Islands were high, the researchers wrote in the study. [Top 10 Greatest Explosions Ever]These Sharks Were Too Busy to Notice a Bigger Predator Watching ThemThe unexpected twist at the end of this feeding frenzy delighted scientists.Credit: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, Windows to the Deep 2019Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really Loud00:35关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65949-marshall-islands-more-radioactivity-chernobyl.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:2802:28  Testing bombs After dropping atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, effectively ending World War II, the United States decided to test more radioactive weapons. Some of these tests happened in the Marshall Islands, a chain of islands between Hawaii and the Philippines that was then a district of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and was run by the U.S. on behalf of the United Nations. The first two bombs, called Able and Baker, were tested on Bikini Atoll in 1946 and kicked off a 12-year period of nuclear testing on the Bikini and Enewetak atolls, during which the U.S. tested 67 nuclear weapons. The first-ever hydrogen bomb test, with the code name Ivy Mike, was tested on Enewetak in 1951. The U.S. conducted its largest hydrogen bomb test on Bikini Atoll — the 1954 Castle Bravo bomb, which was more than 1,000 times more powerful than Little Boy, the uranium weapon that decimated Hiroshima. In addition to contaminating the Bikini and Enewetak atolls, nuclear fallout from the tests also rained down on and sickened people living on Rongelap and Utirik atolls (also part of the Marshall Islands), the researchers said. In 2016, a team of researchers from Columbia University in New York published a study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on the background gamma radiation in three of the northern Marshall atolls: Enewetak, Bikini and Rongelap. The researchers found that radiation levels on Bikini were higher than previously reported, so they decided to do more in-depth studies on radioactivity in the islands. (Nuclear weapons are one source that releases gamma-rays, which are like energetic X-rays.) More fallout Now, that same team has written three new studies, published online yesterday (July 15) in the journal PNAS, on four of the atolls in the northern Marshall islands: Bikini, Enewetak, Rongelap and Utirik. External gamma radiation levels were significantly elevated on Bikini Atoll, on Enjebi Island in Enewetak Atoll and on Naen Island in Rongelap Atoll, compared with an island in the southern Marshall Islands that the scientists used as a control, the researchers found. The levels on Bikini and Naen islands were so high, they surpassed the maximum exposure limit that the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands agreed to in the 1990s, the researchers said. (On a side note, bikini swimsuits weren’t named after the island because of its tropicality, but because the French designer wanted the two-piece swimsuit to be “explosive,” just like the bomb tested there, said one of the study’s senior scientists, Ivana Nikolic-Hughes, director of the K1 Project at the Center for Nuclear Studies and a senior lecturer of chemistry at Columbia University.) [Flying Saucers to Mind Control: 22 Declassified Military & CIA Secrets] The researchers also found that the islands of Runit and Enjebi in Enewetak Atoll, as well as on Bikini and Naen islands, had high concentrations of certain radioactive isotopes in the soil. (An isotope is an element with a different number of neutrons in its nucleus.) These four islands had radioactive plutonium levels that were higher than those found in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the researchers found. “What was surprising was just how high the external gamma radiation was for Naen, which is the outer island for Rongelap Atoll,” Nikolic-Hughes told Live Science. “It was populated during the Bravo test … [the people there] were then moved, moved back and moved again. It’s quite a dreadful history of what happened to Rongelapese people.” In their second study, the researchers worked with professional divers, who collected 130 soil samples from the Castle Bravo Crater at Bikini Atoll. The level of some of the isotopes — plutonium-239 and -240, americium-241 and bismuth-207 — was an order of magnitude higher than levels found on other Marshall Islands, the researchers found. These findings are important because “measuring the radioactive contamination of the crater sediment is a first step in assessing the overall impact of nuclear weapons testing on the ocean ecosystems,” the researchers wrote in the study. In the third study, the researchers tested more than 200 fruits — mostly coconuts and pandanus — on 11 of the islands from four different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Cesium-137 levels didn’t look good for a sizeable chunk of the fruits on Bikini and Rongelap atolls, which had radioactivity levels higher than those deemed safe by several countries and international organizations, the researchers found. More work is needed to educate people living on the Marshall Islands about these dangers. Moreover, these findings and future research can shed light on whether it’s safe for the Marshallese people to resettle or harvest food on some of these islands, the researchers said.last_img read more