Nanotip could play integral part in heatassisted data storage devices

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In this drawing of an atomic force microscope tip transferring heat to a surface, the heated zone causes air molecules to collide, which heats a specific, localized surface with no contact. The technique could help develop heat-assisted magnetic recording, an innovative alternative for future data storage technology. Photo credit: Pierre-Olivier Chapuis et al. Using a tip with a nano heat source that never touches the surface, scientists have shown how to heat a localized surface with no contact. The discovery could open the doors to heat-assisted data storage devices and nano thermometers. Explore further Engineers develop chip that converts wasted heat to usable energy Every year, the world’s data storage needs more than double. Understanding heat transfer on the nanoscale is imperative for fabricating technology that will affect nearly everyone living in first-world countries. All over the world, scientists are rushing to develop an alternative data storage system in an effort to increase the space that our information-overloaded society is running out of. One of the options, called thermally-assisted or heat-assisted data storage, works by using a laser to heat a data disc, which stabilizes the magnetic recording process by making it easier to write data when hot and retain data when subsequently cooled. The process overcomes a critical point that conventional magnetic recording devices will soon encounter, known as the superparamagnetic limit. As scientists increase data storage on conventional systems by making the room-temperature bits smaller, at a certain size the bits will become magnetically unstable, will fall out of place, and their information will vanish.In a recent study on heat transfer between a tip and a surface, scientists from France have made a significant step toward the development of heat-assisted data storage, as well as other applications. The team calculated the heat transfer between a silicon tip and a surface, which is dominated mostly by air conduction.“Heat transfer is well known at the macroscopic level (described by Fourier diffusion when collisions between molecules induce thermodynamic local equilibrium),” Pierre-Olivier Chapuis, coauthor of the recent paper in Nanotechnology, told PhysOrg.com. “Heat transfer can also be calculated in the pure ballistic regime (when there is no collision between molecules). But calculating heat transfer in the intermediate regime, when there are a few collisions, still remains a challenge.”In their experiment, the scientists used a tip with a heat source about 20 nanometers high hovering between zero and 50 nanometers above a surface. The heat transfer occurs when cold molecules in the air are heated when they come in contact with the hot tip, then fly to the disk surface, colliding sometimes with other molecules before reaching the surface. Using Boltzmann’s law on the movement of gas, the scientists proposed for the first time a heat distribution at this scale and levels of heat flux. The team showed that the heat transfer through the air takes only a few tens of picoseconds (10-12) seconds) to propagate from the tip to the surface when there is no contact. The scientists also found that below the height of 10 nanometers, a hot tip can heat a region with an edge of 35 nanometers while maintaining its shape; beyond this height, the shape is lost and the thermal spot increases significantly.Heat-assisted data storage products, which are generally predicted to break into the market around 2010, could achieve data density of trillions of bits (terabytes) per square inch, dwarfing the current density. Scanning thermal microscopy, which acts like a nano thermometer to sense temperature and thermal conductivity on the nanoscale, could also benefit from this non-contact, localized heat transfer method. “In thermally-assisted data storage, levels of heat flux are very important because you need to know if the increase of temperature is enough to reach the crtitical temperature (e.g. melting point),” said Sebastian Volz, coauthor of the study. “Scanning thermal microscopy can benefit from this work because it shows that, by reducing the heat source, you will probe more locally than what can be achieved now. Our work proposes a heat distribution in this field, which could help industrials design their devices.”Citation: Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier, Greffet, Jean-Jacques, Joulain, Karl and Volz, Sebastian. Heat transfer between a nano-tip and a surface. Nanotechnology 17 (2006) 2978-2981.By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com. Citation: Nano-tip could play integral part in heat-assisted data storage devices (2006, June 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-06-nano-tip-heat-assisted-storage-devices.htmllast_img read more

Feynman wasnt joking Modeling quantum dynamics with ground state wavefunctions

first_img © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. This allowed the researchers to specify a direct analogy to the convergence seen in ground state systems – that is, the rate of expansion convergence is inversely proportional to two-body interaction strength. “As far as we know,” McClean says, “nobody has used configuration interaction to do a time-dependent problem in the way we did in our paper.” Researcher Jarrod R. McClean discussed with Phys.org the research that he and his colleagues, Profs. John A. Parkhill and Alán Aspuru-Guzik, conducted. “In solving quantum dynamical problems prior to our findings, the large dimension and complexity of models in quantum mechanics make it very computationally expensive to perform dynamics simulations,” McClean tells Phys.org. “This means that only very short time scales can be examined with high accuracy. Moreover,” he points out, “previous attempts to utilize modern parallel computers have been hindered by strong spatial interactions within quantum systems.””One usually thinks of quantum information as a field that leads to the development of quantum computers,” Harvard’s Aspuru-Guzik notes. “It turns out that classical computing can benefit and learn from the ideas of quantum information. This application of Feynman’s clock to the challenging problem of time evolution is an example of this.”Traditional algorithms utilize parallelization in space, in which a supercomputer comprising many processors spatially distributes and advances the problem in single temporal increments. “What is less natural,” McClean continues, “is to think about the possibility of setting up a calculation that is parallel in time.” This means that the simulation at different points in time has to be simultaneously calculated on many processors. “That’s the focal point of our study,” McClean stresses. “We exploit the clock construction, which was originally designed to think about quantum computing for use in parallel computers.”McClean notes the importance of demonstrating their proposal’s accuracy convergence by applying the configuration interaction method – a linear variational method for solving the nonrelativistic Schrödinger equation. “We wanted to show that the convergence of configuration interaction in spacetime has similar properties to its usual application in ground state chemistry,” he explains. “To do this, we had to find a system of interest where we could also control the importance of two-body and one-body interactions.” (Phys.org) —Amongst the late Richard Feynman’s many prolific and profound contributions to quantum mechanics, the eponymous Feynman clock is perhaps one of the more innovative. Conceived as a solution to the problem of quantum simulation, the Feynman clock proposes using quantum computers to simulate quantum systems – and in so doing, conjectures that if a quantum system moves stepwise forward and then backward in time in equal increments, it would necessarily return to its original state. While originally a linear concept, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Notre Dame recently generalized the proposition to construct a more flexible discrete-time variational principle that leads to a parallel-in-time algorithm. (A variational principle is a scientific principle, used within the calculus of variations, which develops general methods for finding functions which minimize or maximize the value of quantities that depend upon those functions.) The researchers then used that algorithm to describe time-based quantum system evolution as a ground state eigenvalue problem – that is, the quantum system’s lowest energy state – which led them to realize that the solution of the quantum dynamics problem could also be obtained by applying the traditional ground state variational principle. More information: Feynman’s clock, a new variational principle, and parallel-in-time quantum dynamics, PNAS Published online before print September 23, 2013, doi:10.1073/pnas.1308069110 Citation: Feynman wasn’t joking: Modeling quantum dynamics with ground state wavefunctions (2013, October 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-10-feynman-wasnt-quantum-dynamics-ground.html Explore further Researchers propose a new system for quantum simulation Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences To take advantage of parallel processing in time, McClean notes, the scientists also needed to demonstrate that their construction had a natural division into smaller time segments that could be handled independently by different processors on a parallel computer. “The challenge, of course, was to show that this was computationally advantageous in comparison to traditional approaches of stepping forward in time,” he adds.To address these challenges, McClean says that the key insight at the heart of their work was that tools developed in quantum computation may be exportable to classical simulations of quantum systems. “Through this,” he explains, “we recognized that by turning quantum dynamics problems into ground state problems, we could leverage tools from ground state simulation to address difficulties in both the dimension of the space and the length of simulation time required.” In addition, he points out that the key to achieving speedup in parallel-in-time algorithms is the ability to precondition, or develop an inexpensive guess for, the solution in serial mode before refining it in parallel mode. One of the paper’s key findings was that the new construction performs favorably against existing algorithms. “We demonstrated that for a representative quantum system, when the same dynamics and partitioning is performed, our algorithm would finish in less human time than the competing algorithms by making use of parallel computer architectures,” McClean says. “We ensured that all factors in our comparison were as equal as possible, converging to the same level of accuracy and averaging the speedup results over different time partitions.”McClean acknowledges the possibility of constructing similar algorithms from the other time-dependent variational principles. “However,” he points out, “one must be careful when selecting spacetime basis functions. These methods are in their infancy, and it’s a current research topic to develop them for use with the Schrodinger equation and quantum mechanics.”In a similar vein, McClean states that there are other methods that use extended spacetime to remove time-dependence from a problem. “However,” he clarifies, “these methods use the time-independent Hamiltonian in a way that is similar to traditional time-stepping, retaining many of the drawbacks. In our approach, we take a time-independent construction whose ground state directly encodes the dynamics, allowing us to use any number of previously developed techniques for determining the ground state.”In addition, the metrics inspired by their approach can be used to quantitatively understand the errors resulting from truncating the Hilbert space of many-body quantum dynamics. “In order to make quantum simulations tractable,” McClean explains, “it’s almost always necessary to hypothesize that a small part of the quantum space is relevant and simulate exclusively in that space. Our metrics allow researchers to quantitatively assess if the selected space includes all the interesting quantum dynamics – and if not, at exactly what time the violation occurs, thereby making it unnecessary to throw out their entire simulation.” For example, to simulate the dynamics of charge transfer in a protein, it would be necessary to pick a subset of quantum states and model the dynamics within them. “Our error metrics could allow someone to quickly discover if they had selected the wrong states, and reselect them before too much computational power had been wasted.”In other cases, he continues, the necessary states for simulation might be known, but the total time of simulation needed to see a rare event of interest might be too long for a single processor run in serial . “In that case, our technique could be used in conjunction with spatial parallelization to parallelize over time and reduce the human time required to see that rare event. This leads to faster results and more rapid development of continuing experiments.”Moving forward, McClean believes that there are many untapped resources in the field of quantum information which have the potential to advance classical simulation techniques. “Methods developed for adiabatic quantum computation may be directly applicable to our method to further refine its speed and accuracy. In terms of the planned next steps in their research, he adds that they are looking at applying more advanced techniques from electronic structure to the ground state formulation of dynamics. “Hopefully,” he adds, “the methods that have been successful in describing these problems can yield new insights into dynamics problems for quantum chemistry.”McClean notes that there are other areas of research that might benefit from their study. “Our method should be generally applicable across many computational domains that study the time dynamics of physical systems,” he tells Phys.org. “While many schemes currently exploit spatial parallelism to take advantage of modern supercomputers, temporal parallelism has been a relatively untapped resource to date. Our method and variations of it,” McClean concludes, “will likely be very useful in tapping this additional resource to scale physical simulations to previously unreachable timescales.” The spin triangle within the vanadium compound, used as a model system for the TEDVP. Note that coordinating sodium ions and water molecules are not depicted here. The chemical formula of this compound is given by (CN3H6)4Na2[H4V(IV)6 O8(PO|4)4 (OCH2)3 CCH2OH2] · 14H2O. Credit: Copyright © PNAS, doi:10.1073/pnas.1308069110 A schematic representation of the action of the clock Hamiltonian on the history state with three discrete times and a Hilbert space of three states. Each block is a matrix with dimension of the physical system. Credit: Copyright © PNAS, doi:10.1073/pnas.1308069110 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – New fusion power design a space elevator

first_img In other news, a company in Canada got a U.S. patent for a space elevator—their idea is to use modular tubes of Kevlar-polyethylene composites filled with helium to build the structure, which they claim would reach to 12 miles high. The elevator could be used to carry cargo and humans to that height and at the top would be a runway for space planes to take off and land. And another international team of astronomers reported that they have been charting the slow death of the universe. They have conducted the most comprehensive assessment yet of the energy output of the universe measuring the energy generated by 200,000 galaxies, and have found that it is approximately half of what it was two billion years ago.Also, in an interesting turn of events, a team of researchers at Northwestern University uncovered a difference between the sexes—other than the obvious ones, of course. They found evidence of male and female human brains operating differently at the molecular level. Meanwhile, another team of molecular scientists unexpectedly produced a new type of glass—and it might lead to improvements in efficiency of electronic devices.And finally, if you are one of the many people attempting to lose weight by dieting, you might want to know that a team of researchers with US National Institutes of Health has found that a low-fat diet results in more fat loss than low-carb diets, in humans. Now all you will have to do is stick to it. Citation: Best of Last Week – New fusion power design, a space elevator and low-fat diet found to be better than low-carb diet (2015, August 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-week-fusion-power-space-elevator.html © 2015 Phys.org Explore further A cutaway view of the proposed ARC reactor. Thanks to powerful new magnet technology, the much smaller, less-expensive ARC reactor would deliver the same power output as a much larger reactor. Credit: the MIT ARC teamcenter_img (Phys.org)—It was a big week for physics—a research team at MIT created a superfluid in a record-high magnetic field—a Bose-Einstein condensate—for a tenth of a second. And another team at MIT announced a new design that could finally help to bring fusion power closer to reality—in as little as ten years. Meanwhile, a team working at CERN found that protons and antiprotons appear to be true mirror images—the most precise measurements of their charge-to-mass ratio to date. And researchers working at the South Pole-based IceCube experiment reported that a cosmic mystery deepened with the discovery of a new ultra-high-energy neutrino—making it the fourth and highest-energy neutrino yet observed. Also, a team at CalTech announced a discovery in fundamental physics—pinpointing for the first time how instabilities in the arrangement of electrons in metals arise. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Cosmic mystery deepens with discovery of new ultra-high-energy neutrinolast_img read more

Bat species found to have tongue pump to pull in nectar

first_img More information: Nectar uptake in bats using a pumping-tongue mechanism, Science Advances  25 Sep 2015: Vol. 1, no. 8, e1500525, DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1500525AbstractMany insects use nectar as their principal diet and have mouthparts specialized in nectarivory, whereas most nectar-feeding vertebrates are opportunistic users of floral resources and only a few species show distinct morphological specializations. Specialized nectar-feeding bats extract nectar from flowers using elongated tongues that correspond to two vastly different morphologies: Most species have tongues with hair-like papillae, whereas one group has almost hairless tongues that show distinct lateral grooves. Recent molecular data indicate a convergent evolution of groove- and hair-tongued bat clades into the nectar-feeding niche. Using high-speed video recordings on experimental feeders, we show distinctly divergent nectar-feeding behavior in clades. Grooved tongues are held in contact with nectar for the entire duration of visit as nectar is pumped into the mouths of hovering bats, whereas hairy tongues are used in conventional sinusoidal lapping movements. Bats with grooved tongues use a specific fluid uptake mechanism not known from any other mammal. Nectar rises in semiopen lateral grooves, probably driven by a combination of tongue deformation and capillary action. Extraction efficiency declined for both tongue types with a similar slope toward deeper nectar levels. Our results highlight a novel drinking mechanism in mammals and raise further questions on fluid mechanics and ecological niche partitioning. Scientists have seen many examples of animals that lap up liquid in many different ways, they have also seen examples of animals that are able to suck water right out of a river, but until now, there has never been a documented sighting of a an animal that is able to pull a liquid against gravity, using a pumping-mechanism.Intrigued as to how Costa Rican Orange Nectar Bats pull nectar from plants, the team set up a high-speed video camera next to a test tube with a clear liquid meant to serve as nectar and recorded several of them in action. In studying the video, the researchers discovered that the bat lowered its tongue into the liquid and then simply held it there while the liquid miraculously made its way up the tongue and into the mouth. Closer examination showed that the tongue had two grooves (which were open to the air) along its length and that tiny muscles appeared to be undulating along the sides of the groves as the liquid was pulled up—serving as a pumping mechanism of some sort. Explore further Hummingbird tongues are tiny pumps that spring open to draw in nectar (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers affiliated with the University of Ulm in Germany and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has found that one species of bat has a method of collecting nectar that has never been seen before in any other animal. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes how they discovered the unique eating method using high speed cameras, and their theories on how it works. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play Author Marco Tschapka describes the unusual way some bats use their tongues to obtain nectar. Credit: AAAS/ Carla Schaffer Journal information: Science Advancescenter_img Play Tongue of Lonchophylla. robusta at near-maximum extension (detail, lateral view). Credit: Tschapka, Gonzalez-Terrazas, Knörnschild Sci. Adv. 2015;1:e1500525 The researchers cannot say for sure what is going on, but suspect two forces are at work: capillary action and muscle force. They believe it is likely the liquid is held in the grooves by capillary action, and that the tiny muscles somehow force the liquid to move upwards, against gravity—sort of like allowing one end of a sponge to rest in water while continuously wringing out the water that is pulled into other parts. The result is an odd, unique and efficient means for drawing nectar from a flower. They note that the unique physiology of the mouth suggests that the bats evolved their way of eating independently of other species. The pumping tongue nectar-feeding bat Lonchophylla robusta visiting a bromeliad flower. Credit: M. Tschapka/University of Ulm PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2015 Phys.org Citation: Bat species found to have tongue pump to pull in nectar (2015, September 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-09-species-tongue-nectar.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Nanoparticles act as surgical blades for improved dental surgery

first_img Explore further Citation: Nanoparticles act as surgical blades for improved dental surgery (2018, February 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-nanoparticles-surgical-blades-dental-surgery.html Artistic depiction of engineered nanoparticles containing enzymes that function as surgical blades. Credit: Zinger et al. ©2018 American Chemical Society Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgery Journal information: ACS Nano © 2018 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Assaf Zinger et al. “Proteolytic Nanoparticles Replace a Surgical Blade by Controllably Remodeling the Oral Connective Tissue.” ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.7b07983 Currently, more than 80 nanotechnologies have been approved for a variety of medical applications, from treating cancer to bioimaging to tissue remodeling. Now in a new study, researchers have shown that enzyme-containing nanoparticles can perform minor dental surgery and improve the outcome of dental braces for reorienting severely misaligned teeth into their proper position. Tests showed that rats treated with the nanoparticles before wearing braces exhibited better tooth alignment, reduced tooth relapse, faster recovery, and less pain compared to rats that underwent traditional surgery before braces.The researchers, led by Avi Schroeder at Technion-Israel Institue of Technology, have published a paper on the new nanotechnology in a recent issue of ACS Nano.”I think we are trying to change a 5000-year dogma of the way surgeries are performed,” Schroeder told Phys.org. “Specifically, the existing scalpel cannot distinguish between healthy and diseased tissue. However, enzymes can. Proteolytic enzymes are tuned to degrade specific tissues, without harming other healthy tissues. We believe that in the future surgeries must be more accurate, with less damage to healthy tissues.”The researchers designed the new procedure specifically to address cases of severe misalignment of teeth, termed “malocclusion.” Currently, this condition is treated with minor yet often painful surgery to cut the collagen fibers that connect the teeth to the bone, followed by braces to move the teeth into their proper position. Besides a painful recovery period, about 40% of patients experience relapse and require a second cycle of treatment.The nanotechnology treatment has the potential to greatly improve this treatment procedure by allowing the body’s own natural enzymes to break down the collagen fibers and for other natural biomolecules to rebuild the fibers when the teeth are correctly aligned with braces. To do this, the researchers engineered nanoparticles consisting of a liposome vesicle (basically an empty cell membrane) filled with the enzyme collagenase. Collagenase causes collagen fibers to weaken and break, but only when first activated by calcium, which occurs naturally in the mouth. In order to ensure that the collagenase only begins working at the surgical site, the liposome acts as a protective vehicle to safely transport the collagenase to the sulcus (located between the gums and teeth), where it begins diffusing out and interacting with calcium. The researchers determined the particular collagenase concentration that causes the collagenase to weaken the collagen fibers by approximately 50%, making it much easier for braces to reorient the teeth. Over the next several hours, the body’s own fibroblasts sense the weakened collagen and initiate collagen remodeling, restoring the fibers to their original strength. Overall, tests with rats showed that those treated with the nanosurgical procedure experienced a three-fold enhancement in tooth alignment, along with significantly less tooth relapse and less pain compared to rats treated with traditional surgery. The researchers attribute the improvement to the fact that the nanosurgical procedure allows the tissue and bone to be remodeled at the new orientation, in contrast to stressed teeth returning to their original position as often occurs in the traditional procedure. The results suggest that the nanosurgical procedure has the potential to replace the more invasive traditional method with an overall improved outcome.”Here we demonstrated the bio-surgery approach for the first time,” Schroeder said. “We plan to expand to other organs and more challenging procedures in the future.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Chimp communication gestures found to follow human linguistics rules

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers with members from the U.K., Switzerland and Spain has found that chimpanzees use communication gestures in ways that follow human linguistic rules. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of chimps communicating with one another in the wild, and compares their observations against human communication rules. Explore further Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Over the years, linguistic researchers have discovered that human language conforms to specific rules regardless of the language in which it is spoken. Such rules have names to make them more easily discussed. One such rule, Zipf’s law of abbreviation, holds that words that are used frequently tend to be short. Another rule is called Menzerath’s law—it says that large language structures tend to be made up of multiple short segments (syllables) when spoken. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if such rules might apply to other animals. To find out, they obtained and studied video footage of wild chimpanzees living and communicating in Uganda’s Budongo Forest Reserve.The researchers were able to identify approximately 2,000 examples of 58 unique gestures used by the chimps when communicating with one another. Since chimps cannot speak, they communicate by using hand gestures, body posture, facial expressions and they make various noises. By combining gestures that are available to them, chimps are able to convey a wide variety of messages to one another.The researchers found that human language rules do apply to the chimpanzees’ use of gestures—the most commonly used gestures tended to be quite short, for example, and longer gestures tended to be broken up by multiple shorter gestures. They suggest that this indicates that despite the major differences in the mode of communication, the underpinnings of the two communications systems follow the same basic mathematical principles. Interestingly, an international team of researchers found just last year that human toddlers and chimps have very similar communications systems.The researchers plan to continue their research by expanding their analysis to include other species—they expect to focus on bonobos next because they are known to use many of the same gestures as chimpanzees. Researchers decode gestures used by chimpanzees to communicate with each othercenter_img © 2019 Science X Network Citation: Chimp communication gestures found to follow human linguistics rules (2019, February 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-chimp-gestures-human-linguistics.html More information: Raphaela Heesen et al. Linguistic laws in chimpanzee gestural communication, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2019). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2018.2900 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Colours of dreams and thoughts

first_imgHis exhibition called Evening Dreams and The Mind-Bending is a combined effort of three years. It’s a set of 30 paintings done on canvases with acrylics.‘Evening Dreams is about myself. Its drawn from the early years I spent growing up. It also narrates my experiences, travels and journeys of life. The Mind-Bending on the other hand is inspired from outer space. The core of the universe, I believe, is not an external element but lies deep within,’ he adds. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’At 23, he aspires to make people think through his art. How? ‘All my paintings are abstract expressions. They aim to take people back to their childhood or when we were born. When the mind was just a plain blank entity. It’s during this time the most creative thoughts develop,’ says Arash.‘Since childhood I had an eye for colours. It’s unusual how my canvases appear by themselves when I apply the wash technique over them. Plus, whenever I start painting there are no preconcieved thoughts,’ he added.Priced between Rs 10,000 to Rs 50,000, he calls his art work unique and rare, after which he is gearing up for his next series based upon vaanis from the Holy Guru Granth Sahib.DETAILAt- Arpana Art Gallery, Siri Fort Area On till- Today Timings- 3 pm onwardslast_img read more

There are things comedians want to say but dont

first_imgWith a show curated and designed by him, Singh is all set to call a spade a spade. The show Shut The Mic Up will feature Amit Tandon along with opening acts by Danny George and Madhav Mehta.Speaking to Millennium Post, Singh explained that the whole idea behind the show is to drop the guard and get candid. There will also be an interview session where Singh will be throwing questions at Tandon about his life and the funny career decision.This is to bring out the human face of the comedian says Singh. ‘People often misunderstand comedians, am going to try break that down,’ adds the funnyman.WHEN: 7 November, 8 pm onwardsWHERE: Akshara Theatre, BKS Marglast_img read more

For nice winter evenings

first_imgWinter is for foodies. There’s no two ways to that belief and a lovely way to explore this best is when we go restaurant hopping. Millennium Post checked out two new ones in the Capital. Here’s the lowdownFio Cookhouse & Bar, Epicuria, Nehru PlaceAfter the success of the excellent restaurant in the Garden of Five Senses, Fio has opened a fresh new outlet at Nehru Place’s Epicuria. For starters the location is brilliant, you are nestled below the metro station but you cannot feel a single tremor. The interiors are sleek and cosy and they also have tables outside with heaters for the season.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Let the bartender surprise you with some excellent cocktails as you enjoy the view. That’s what we did and he gave us something that can be best described as a Kala Khatta with a kick. It hands down one of the best cocktails we have ever tasted. Fio has European and Indian dishes on offer and they also have an excellent brunch menu. We had the Spit Fire Grilled Chicken and the Char Grilled Chicken which were perfectly done. The Spit Fire Grilled Chicken gets our vote. They also served up some excellent chicken tikka. But the Salmon Salad is something that took our breath away. If you are in Fio – you have to try the salad. The salmon was fresh, delectably pink and went perfectly with the greens. A lot of restaurants spoil the fish by cooking it terribly wrong – that should just be illegal. Salmon is a great fish and it should be enjoyed as fresh as it comes.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixTry the tiramisu for dessert – it comes in a very cute jar.  A meal for two at Fio’s would be Rs 2500 (without taxes and alcohol). If you are around Nehru Place – check out Fio. It is quite a laid back, lovely place that makes for great evenings. Market Cafe, GK II, M BlockYou must have visited the Market Cafe in Khan Market, what they have in GK II is their latest outlet. At the very onset the cafe soothes you with the lovely blue interiors. Since the focus is on Mediterranean cuisine, the setting is perfect.   While you have to forget about the liquor for a while, the Cafe whips up some great mocktails. Over-looking a park, it is a great place to spend a nice lazy afternoon over the dip platter. We tried the nachos topped with cheese and beans and they were very good.  For the main course we were served the Turkish Turlu (Pan Roasted Veggies – Chickpeas – Herb Couscous – Tomato Celery Broth) and the Grilled Fish (Grilled fillets of fish – Sautéed Veggies – Herbed potatoes  – Lime Coriander Cream Sauce). The Grilled Fish is excellent and definitely something we would recommend to anyone visiting the cafe. The desserts are excellent at Market Cafe – try the molten chocolate for sure. It is divine and so excellently sinful that it is a must for the winter chill. A meal for two comes to about Rs 1500 (without taxes). Do head over – this place is worth a visit.last_img read more

In rhythm and verses

first_imgShe was shocked to see the condition of Haveli which was occupied by a Taal and a PCO was operating from there. In order to restore the Ghalib’s Haveli to its rightful place Sharma formed a committee Ghalib Memorial Movement with eminent people.They then approached Sheila Dikshit to help in getting the Haveli Vacated and make it into a Heritage site. With the then CMs interest and their relentless efforts the Haveli was finally restore and is now a befitting Memorial to the great poet. To commemorate the event Sharma has been organising Ghalib’s Birth-Death Anniversary every year which includes a Candle Light Procession to Ghalib’s Haveli from Town Hall and a cultural programme based on Ghalib’s writing. The evening’s programme is a culmination of this year’s Ghalib’s Death Anniversary Celebration.  The event is scheduled for  8 February at Multipurpose Hall, India International Centre, Max Muller Marg. Head over for this one!WHEN: 8 February, 6:30 pmWHERE: Multipurpose Hall, IIClast_img read more