Leguan farmers feel ignored

first_imgRice industry challengesIn a recent visit to the Essequibo Island of Leguan, Agriculture Minister, Noel Holder had met with a few cattle and poultry farmers to, among other things, gather updates on the state of those industries.GRDB General Manager Nizam HassanAgriculture Minister Noel HolderHowever, this visit angered residents as the minister was reportedly reluctant to meet with rice farmers. This comes on the heels of statements the minister expressed which noted that some of the challenges that face the rice industry should be sorted out between farmers and miers.On Monday Guyana Times was told that rice farmers were prepared to engage Minister Holder as he was on the island but were left astonished when they were by-passed. “Abbe close off to go and reach de man…but de man come and go-way back,” one rice farmer complained:“[I feel] very bad, they not interested in Agriculture, he met with cattle farmers and poultry farmers, and encouraged them to mek plenty duck and pig,” the farmer explained.This newspaper was also told that the minister also stopped albeit briefly at the office of the Neighbourhood Democratic Council (NDC) but did not engage councillors who were reportedly prepared to engage in discussions over the plight of the rice industry.Meanwhile,Guyana Times was also told that Guyana Rice Development Board (GRDB) General Manger, Nizam Hassan is slated to visit the island on Thursday. This comes after farmers there had registered their complaints over not being consulted on the future of the rice industry. They had noted that GRDB had reduced its meetings with them.In late July Guyana Times had interviewed farmers in the Essequibo islands of Legaun, and Wakenaam, Region Three, and in Mahaicony, Region Five (Mahaica-Berbice), who all related that GRDB had not been engaging them on the future of the rice industry.“Me ain’t hear nothing as yet, dem nah keep no meeting as yet,” rice famer Jaichand (only name) had explained. This newspaper had also reported that at Leguan, GRDB had not met with farmers in over three months.Meanwhile, a female farmer Sharmilla Ally had told Guyana Times that her challenges have been significant, so much so that she and her husband, Astraf Ally were not able recover the costs of their investments.Last year, Venezuela officially terminated Guyana’s PetroCaribe deal which saw the exchange of fuel and rice at “favourable prices”, as the Spanish-speaking nation teamed up with Suriname to pursue a similar agreement.The agreement, signed between Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and his Surinamese counterpart Desi Bouterse, will allow Suriname to continue to receive favourable rates on oil in exchange for rice.Only on Saturday, rice farmers in Region Two (Pomeroon-Supenaam) expressed dissatisfaction with the current paddy prices being offered by millers. The prices range from $1500-$2300 for grades A, B and C, and according to them the venture is quiet unprofitable.During interviews with rice farmers along the Essequibo Coast, farmers complained that the price millers are offering cannot sustain their livelihood. Most of them explained that they have loans to repay at commercial banks and they are worried that with the current prices they will not be able to offset their overhead expenses.Last crop rice farmers were offered low prices which forced many of them out of business.last_img read more

Height of planned buildings debated

first_imgVALENCIA – A pair of office buildings planned for a prominent intersection near Six Flags Magic Mountain might be too tall, county officials say. But The Newhall Land and Farming Company this week will make its case that the buildings fit into an overall project that will remake the area’s look. The two four-story buildings are planned for a plateau by Magic Mountain Parkway and The Old Road. The buildings would be 80 feet tall, and the plateau is 65 feet higher than the intersection, according to county planning officials, who want the project to be redesigned. “There are no natural features that would lessen the impact of the project on the surrounding area,” the officials wrote in a report to the county Regional Planning Commission. The commission on Wednesday will review the project. In their report to the commission, county planners argued that the project is “out of character for the area due to height and mass.” That may be the case now, but from Newhall Land’s perspective the buildings fit just fine into its larger plan for the area, said Marlee Lauffer, spokeswoman for the company. Newhall Land wants to build a development called Entrada on hundreds of acres in the area, bringing in commercial space, offices, stores, restaurants and perhaps homes. County officials have pointed out that the office buildings will stand out to motorists going by on nearby Interstate 5. But Lauffer said other structures in the Santa Clarita Valley also are visible from the I-5. “It’s not an unusual height, and certainly fits in with the overall master plan for the area,” Lauffer said. If the project is approved, the developer could break ground for construction in the summer, and the office towers could be finished in a year. “We think it’s a great land-use plan, so we’re looking forward to presenting it to the commission,” Lauffer said. County planning officials say the project, which would be near several single-story restaurants, would bring needed jobs to an area that has many more homes than employment opportunities. But they have suggested that the project be redesigned so it is shorter and wider, which would make it stand out less. alex.dobuzinskis@dailynews.com (661) 257-5253160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Barca closing in on La Liga title ahead of Celta trip

first_img0Shares0000Lionel Messi and Barcelona are on a record 39-match unbeaten run in La Liga © AFP/File / LLUIS GENEMADRID, Spain, Apr 16 – Barcelona will have one eye on the Copa del Rey final while Europe is the main focus for Real and Atletico Madrid so what is left for La Liga?Barca are 11 points clear at the top of the table but, with an overhaul of the squad expected in the summer, few players can afford to ease off during the run-in. Atletico will hope to beat rivals Real to second but both teams have their priorities now in Europe, with Real facing Bayern Munich in the Champions League semi-finals and Atleti up against Arsenal in the last four of the Europa League next week.Sevilla face a crucial few days in their chase for European football next season while at the bottom of the table, Levante can all but secure safety with a win over Malaga.Here are five things to look out for in the midweek fixtures in Spain:Barca squad playing for their futuresThe league title may be all but sewn up and the treble dream extinguished but Barca’s players are now playing for places, both in the short-term, for Saturday’s Copa del Rey final against Sevilla, and further ahead, to stay beyond the summer.Andres Iniesta and Samuel Umtiti are both pondering their futures while successors, even if not replacements, need to be found for ageing stars like Gerard Pique, Sergio Busquets and Luis Suarez.Ousmane Dembele and Andre Gomes still have it all to prove. Fringe players are expected to be given a chance against ninth-placed Celta Vigo on Tuesday. They need to impress.Bale can look to Isco for inspirationIsco has shown the way in how to regain favour under Zinedine Zidane, the Spaniard continuing his recent surge with a goal and an assist against Malaga on Sunday.After scoring a hat-trick for Spain against Argentina, Zidane was impressed enough to start the midfielder against Juventus last week, and Gareth Bale might draw encouragement from Isco’s revival.Bale’s strained relationship with Zidane took another turn for the worse after he was harshly hauled off at half-time against Juve but he may be given another shot against Athletic Bilbao on Wednesday.With the first leg of the Champions League semi-final against Bayern Munich to come next week, Bale needs a performance.Atletico juggling pursuit of Europa League gloryAtletico Madrid travel to Real Sociedad on Thursday, knowing defeat could give Barca the chance to wrap up the title in their next match against Deportivo La Coruna on April 29.But another strong season for Atleti, in which Champions League qualification is already confirmed, can be given extra gloss if they win the Europa League.The challenge for Diego Simeone’s paper-thin squad is to stay fresh, with the two-legged semi-final against Arsenal starting at Emirates Stadium next week. Real Sociedad may be primed to take advantage.Crunch time for SevillaSevilla’s season could be defined by the next five days as a trip to lowly Deportivo La Coruna on Tuesday is followed by Saturday’s Copa del Rey final.There was no shame in their admirable Champions League run ending at the hands of Bayern last week but fail to beat Deportivo, and Sevilla may struggle to qualify for the Europa League next term, let alone the continent’s premier club competition.A more difficult route to the Europa League would be to beat Barca and win the cup. It is time to deliver.Safety beckons for LevanteLevante can take a major step towards survival by beating bottom-club Malaga on Thursday.Five points separate them from 18th-placed Deportivo, meaning the gap could be stretched to eight after this round, with five games left to play.Espanyol above them are 10 points clear of the bottom three, but Quique Sanchez Flores’ side have endured a concerning dip since the turn of the year. They are at home to Eibar on Wednesday.Fixtures TuesdayDeportivo La Coruna v Sevilla (8:30pm), Celta Vigo v Barcelona (10pm), Villarreal v Leganes (10:30pm)WednesdayEspanyol v Eibar (8:30pm), Valencia v Getafe (8:30pm), Real Madrid v Athletic Bilbao (10:30pm)ThursdayReal Sociedad v Atletico Madrid, Alaves v Girona (8:30pm), Levante v Malaga, Real Betis v Las Palmas (10:30pm)0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

TRANSFER LATEST: Burnley set to complete £3.5m double raid on Charlton Athletic

first_img Johann Berg Gudmundsson [left] in action for Iceland against France at Euro 2016 1 Burnley are on the verge of landing Charlton Athletic duo Johann Berg Gudmundsson and Nick Pope.The Premier League new boys have yet to make any major signings this summer.But Sean Dyche has been working hard to bring in fresh blood and the Clarets have now all but completed deals for Gudmundsson and Pope.Gudmundsson, a skilful wide player, has impressed for Charlton since joining the Addicks in 2014 from AZ Alkmaar.He has made 81 appearances for the south London club, scoring 16 goals, and was a key part of the Iceland side which enjoyed a sensational run at Euro 2016, starting every game as they reached the quarter-finals of the competition.Burnley agreed a £2.5m fee with Charlton for the 25-year-old earlier this month and he will finalise the switch this week after returning from holiday.They will also bring in his teammate Pope after agreeing a deal with the League One side late last week for the goalkeeper.The 24-year-old joined Charlton from Bury Town in 2011 and, after various spells on loan, became a first-team regular last season.Pope was among Charlton’s most impressive performers but was unable to prevent their relegation from the Championship.The fee for the shot-stopper is understood to be in the region of £1million.last_img read more

Making the world a better, tidier place

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “My mom never forgot where she came from and what it meant to grow up the poor child of immigrant parents.” – Mike Harvey. She never carried a gun or made an arrest, but Mickey Harvey was the heart and soul of the San Fernando Police Department. “I called her my boss,” says Chief Anthony Alba. “She had the run of the place.” It seems wherever Mickey Harvey went in life she had the run of the place. It wouldn’t surprise anyone in her family or the police department if she was up in heaven right now straightening things out and taking care of people who could use a little help. It was what this remarkable woman who died of a heart attack at 87 on New Year’s Eve did best. “Mom lived on $1,300 a month, but would give you her last nickel if she thought it would help you,” says her son, police Lt. Mike Harvey. Every weekday morning for the last 20 years, Mickey arrived at the San Fernando police station at 5 a.m. to straighten things out and clean up the report room so when the detectives arrived around 7 a.m. everything was ready to go. “Once in a while she’d leave a little note saying, ‘Your mother doesn’t work here, but I cleaned up for you anyway, so please try to keep it tidy,”‘ Alba said, laughing. Actually, Lt. Mike Harvey’s mother did work there. “I was in the detective bureau back when she started,” he says. “Our commander wanted us to go to lunch together, but we needed someone to stay behind to answer the phones. “I asked my mom – who was retired and lived close to the station – if she minded volunteering once or twice a week to answer the phones for an hour. She said sure.” Once or twice a week grew to five days a week. Twenty years later, Mickey Harvey was still answering the phones, tidying up, and basically having the run of the place. “It wasn’t long before she had better access in the department than I did,” Mike says. “Everybody just fell in love with her.” It didn’t surprise him. Everybody always fell in love with his mother. She was born Rosealien McNamees, the youngest daughter in an immigrant Irish family that moved from Coney Island, N.Y., to an Italian-Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn when she was 7. “Whenever my Italian friends saw me coming down the street they’d yell out, ‘Here comes the Mick,’ and the nickname just stuck,” Mickey Harvey told me seven years ago when she was being honored by the city for her volunteer work on her 80th birthday. It was a term of endearment for the neighborhood’s only Irish lass – a nickname hung on Irish immigrants when they came to America at the turn of the century and began cooking and selling potatoes that were called Mickeys in ashcans on the streets. “During World War II, as I was leaving for work in the morning, the Italian grandmothers would shout out from their windows, ‘You be good, Mick,”‘ she recalled. They needn’t have worried. The government was already making sure of that. Nobody in the old neighborhood knew, but the Mick was one of the most important women in the country as she walked down those streets each morning to catch the Brooklyn-to-Manhattan subway line to work. She was one of only three people in the country who had the combination to the vault room of Carl L. Norden Inc. on Beaver Street in Manhattan where she worked. Inside that vault were all the records and plans for the Norden bombsight – a mechanical computer designed to determine the exact moment bombs needed to be released in order to hit their target. Nothing got out of that vault room without the Mick’s OK. Barely 21, she was guarding one of this country’s most precious military secrets when most girls her age were working at Macy’s or Gimbals. “I’d be locked in that vault all day locating pieces of plans and records that the country’s top engineers needed to refine the bombsight to work even better,” Harvey remembered. “They had me taking a different route to the subway at night, just in case anyone was watching me. Then I’d get home and have dinner with my family like nothing was happening. “I couldn’t even tell my mother and father what I was doing all day. They just had to trust me.” They did, until the war ended and their daughter left national security to work in a less stressful job – assistant director of tours for NBC Studios at Rockefeller Plaza – then later as assistant to the president of a private investigative firm in Los Angeles until she retired. Then her phone rang one day 20 years ago, and her son, the cop, wanted to know if his mother minded answering the phones at his station house during lunch a few days a week. Later this week, Mike and his sister, Sheelin, will fulfill their mother’s last wish by returning to her birthplace, Coney Island, to scatter her ashes on the beach. “She loved growing up near the ocean and was very proud to have come from America’s first melting pot, a place where the world’s poor came to make their American dreams come true,” Mike says. It was just like their mother not to want any of her friends on the police department to send flowers or make a donation to a charitable cause in her memory. She had something else in mind. “She wanted everyone to spend a little extra time with their loved ones this year, especially parents and grandparents,” Mike says. “Mom always felt there was nothing more precious than the memories of time spent with your loved ones after they were gone.” R.I.P., Mick. You were one classy lady. Dennis McCarthy’s column appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday. Dennis McCarthy, (818) 713-3749 dennis.mccarthy@dailynews.com – Mike Harvey. She never carried a gun or made an arrest, but Mickey Harvey was the heart and soul of the San Fernando Police Department. “I called her my boss,” says Chief Anthony Alba. “She had the run of the place.” It seems wherever Mickey Harvey went in life she had the run of the place. It wouldn’t surprise anyone in her family or the police department if she was up in heaven right now straightening things out and taking care of people who could use a little help. It was what this remarkable woman who died of a heart attack at 87 on New Year’s Eve did best. “Mom lived on $1,300 a month, but would give you her last nickel if she thought it would help you,” says her son, police Lt. Mike Harvey. Every weekday morning for the last 20 years, Mickey arrived at the San Fernando police station at 5 a.m. to straighten things out and clean up the report room so when the detectives arrived around 7 a.m. everything was ready to go. “Once in a while she’d leave a little note saying, ‘Your mother doesn’t work here, but I cleaned up for you anyway, so please try to keep it tidy,”‘ Alba said, laughing. Actually, Lt. Mike Harvey’s mother did work there. “I was in the detective bureau back when she started,” he says. “Our commander wanted us to go to lunch together, but we needed someone to stay behind to answer the phones. “I asked my mom – who was retired and lived close to the station – if she minded volunteering once or twice a week to answer the phones for an hour. She said sure.” Once or twice a week grew to five days a week. Twenty years later, Mickey Harvey was still answering the phones, tidying up, and basically having the run of the place. “It wasn’t long before she had better access in the department than I did,” Mike says. “Everybody just fell in love with her.” It didn’t surprise him. Everybody always fell in love with his mother. She was born Rosealien McNamees, the youngest daughter in an immigrant Irish family that moved from Coney Island, N.Y., to an Italian-Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn when she was 7. “Whenever my Italian friends saw me coming down the street they’d yell out, ‘Here comes the Mick,’ and the nickname just stuck,” Mickey Harvey told me seven years ago when she was being honored by the city for her volunteer work on her 80th birthday. It was a term of endearment for the neighborhood’s only Irish lass – a nickname hung on Irish immigrants when they came to America at the turn of the century and began cooking and selling potatoes that were called Mickeys in ashcans on the streets. “During World War II, as I was leaving for work in the morning, the Italian grandmothers would shout out from their windows, ‘You be good, Mick,”‘ she recalled. They needn’t have worried. The government was already making sure of that. Nobody in the old neighborhood knew, but the Mick was one of the most important women in the country as she walked down those streets each morning to catch the Brooklyn-to-Manhattan subway line to work. She was one of only three people in the country who had the combination to the vault room of Carl L. Norden Inc. on Beaver Street in Manhattan where she worked. Inside that vault were all the records and plans for the Norden bombsight – a mechanical computer designed to determine the exact moment bombs needed to be released in order to hit their target. Nothing got out of that vault room without the Mick’s OK. Barely 21, she was guarding one of this country’s most precious military secrets when most girls her age were working at Macy’s or Gimbals. “I’d be locked in that vault all day locating pieces of plans and records that the country’s top engineers needed to refine the bombsight to work even better,” Harvey remembered. “They had me taking a different route to the subway at night, just in case anyone was watching me. Then I’d get home and have dinner with my family like nothing was happening. “I couldn’t even tell my mother and father what I was doing all day. They just had to trust me.” They did, until the war ended and their daughter left national security to work in a less stressful job – assistant director of tours for NBC Studios at Rockefeller Plaza – then later as assistant to the president of a private investigative firm in Los Angeles until she retired. Then her phone rang one day 20 years ago, and her son, the cop, wanted to know if his mother minded answering the phones at his station house during lunch a few days a week. Later this week, Mike and his sister, Sheelin, will fulfill their mother’s last wish by returning to her birthplace, Coney Island, to scatter her ashes on the beach. “She loved growing up near the ocean and was very proud to have come from America’s first melting pot, a place where the world’s poor came to make their American dreams come true,” Mike says. It was just like their mother not to want any of her friends on the police department to send flowers or make a donation to a charitable cause in her memory. She had something else in mind. “She wanted everyone to spend a little extra time with their loved ones this year, especially parents and grandparents,” Mike says. “Mom always felt there was nothing more precious than the memories of time spent with your loved ones after they were gone.” R.I.P., Mick. You were one classy lady. Dennis McCarthy’s column appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday. Dennis McCarthy, (818) 713-3749 dennis.mccarthy@dailynews.comlast_img read more

Man caught with ten stolen mobile phones jailed for 6 months

first_imgA man who was caught with ten stolen mobile phones has been jailed for six months.Sabin Rostas appeared at Letterkenny District Court after being caught with the phones at a routine Garda patrol at Oldtown, Letterkenny on February 24th last. The court was told that all ten phones had been stolen on the same night at the Warehouse Bar in Letterkenny.Solicitor Patsy Gallagher said his client was not charged with theft and that other people who were not before the court were responsible for that.He said everyone whose phone had been stolen had received them back despite the fact that they were without them for a period of time.He said his client had gathered some cash and wanted to compensate the victims for the period of time without their phones.Rostas, aged 28 from The Green, Convoy, also pleaded guilty to the theft of a purse form a handbag in the Voodoo NIghtclub in Letterkenny on December 24th, 2017.The court was told that CCTV showed Rostas putting the purse into a ceiling space inside the men’s toilets but that €70 in cash taken from the purse was never recovered.Judge Paul Kelly said Rostas, who has seven previous convictions, had got off lightly until now with community services and fines.“There’s only one way I can deal with this,” added Judge Kelly.He sentenced Rostas to three months in prison for the purse theft but backdated that sentence to March 17th when he went into custody and a further three months for possession of the stolen phones.Man caught with ten stolen mobile phones jailed for 6 months was last modified: June 7th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

‘He looks like his Angry Bird!’ – Theo Walcott suffers gruesome injury at Arsenal

first_img Walcott was aiming to give his old side a headache silverware 2 Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Making a return to his old stomping ground, the speedy winger looked to give his former side plenty of problems.His pace and ability to run in behind caused the Gunners‘ backline headaches all throughout the first half, but it was Walcott who would have left the pitch feeling the most dazed.While it was not quite as bad as Roberto Firmino’s injury against north London rivals Tottenham last weekend, it was certainly a painful one. Sky Sports presenter apologises for remarks made during Neville’s racism discussion Gerrard launches furious touchline outburst as horror tackle on Barisic sparks chaos SORRY 2 England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won Theo Walcott’s eye looks so ugly lol— ⚪️🔴⚪️🔴 (@foreverafc1) September 23, 2018 Walcott required treatment for the injury And fans even compared him to Alexander Povetkin after his devastating KO loss to Anthony Joshua on Saturday evening. Check out the best responses below! Theo Walcott suddenly supporting a swollen eye that looks like he was on last night’s #AJvsPovetkin undercard #ARSEVE— Matt Roberts (@atwmroberts) September 23, 2018center_img Theo Walcott currently looks like the angry bird they made for him— Harry (@H_Joiner01) September 23, 2018 gameday cracker How Everton could look in January under Ancelotti with new signings predicted A proper shiner for Theo Walcott. He needs to get a steak on that at half-time. Or a used tea-bag at least.— Paddy Power (@paddypower) September 23, 2018 BEST OF Theo Walcott suffered a gruesome eye injury upon his return to Arsenal which drew some hilarious response from fans on social media.The Everton forward appeared to pick it up after his own shot rebounded off Petr Cech and back into his face. That’s a nasty looking eye injury Theo Walcott has there #ouch #ARSEVE— Janeymode (@Janeymode) September 23, 2018 The average first-team salaries at every Premier League club in 2019 Most Popular Football Stories latest revealed scrap Theo Walcott continuing his tradition of strange injuries with the swollen EYELID.— 7amkickoff (@7amkickoff) September 23, 2018last_img read more

McHUGH BACKS CALLS FOR SINGLE TRAVEL AREA WITH UK TO BOOST TOURISM

first_imgThe Co-Chairman of the British Irish Parliamentary Assembly Joe McHugh TD has supported the call of the Minister for Transport, Tourism & Sport Leo Varadkar for the extension of the Common Travel Area between Britain and Ireland to provide a single tourist visa for people travelling to both countries.Minister Varadkar made the call when he addressed the 44th plenary of the British Irish Parliamentary Assembly in the Seanad chamber, Leinster House, Dublin, today.An extension of the Common Travel Area was one of four areas which Minister Varadkar said he would like to see pursued by the Assembly, the other three being: •a common travel area for hauliers by setting up a functional area ofBritain and Ireland for cabotage;•pursuing the delivery of mutual recognition of penalty points; and•organising a parliamentary Gathering for 2013, as part of theyear-long Gathering festival of festivals being held in Ireland nextyear.During his address Minister Varadkar said that while Ireland and Britain may not be in a position to join the Schengen area that allows tourists from the Middle East and Asia to travel to 20 European countries, Britain and Ireland should have a ‘mini-Schengen’ to mutually accept British and Irish visas.Deputy McHugh said that the British Irish Parliamentary Assembly had consistently called for easier access and freedom of movement for visitors between Britain and Ireland and that the ‘mini-Schengen’ proposal was a commonsense step to facilitate tourism and economic development.Minister Varadkar said: ‘It is my view that just as we have a CommonTravel Area for our citizens, we need to have a Common Travel Area fortourists. Our Schengen area counterparts have a huge competitiveadvantage over us. A tourist from China, for example, can get a visawhich takes in the entire Schengen area. But they will have to get aseparate visa for the United Kingdom and another one for Ireland’. “I know this is an area attracting considerable attention alreadybetween the British and Irish Governments and while there are variouslegislative and technological barriers it is something worthpursuing.”Deputy McHugh said: ‘The development of tourism is fundamental to oureconomic recovery. Significant events such as the Gathering are beingdeveloped to encourage visitors to Ireland in the coming years, andmajor marketing campaigns are taking place internationally in supportof this’.“At the same time, the Governments should also look at ways to make iteasier for visitors to access and travel between Britain and Ireland.We still have a situation where some international guests require twoseparate visas to visit Donegal and Derry. This should be addressed asa priority issue that will encourage tourism and economic developmentin both countries.” McHUGH BACKS CALLS FOR SINGLE TRAVEL AREA WITH UK TO BOOST TOURISM was last modified: May 14th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:McHUGH BACKS CALLS FOR SINGLE TRAVEL AREA WITH UK TO BOOST TOURISMlast_img read more

Even House opponents say base closure measure will pass

first_img “This is the wrong message to send while we are at war,” said LaHood, whose district includes a base in Springfield, Ill., that is to lose 15 National Guard fighter jets. But the Pentagon, the White House and GOP congressional leaders dismiss that argument. They contend that eliminating extra space will free up money that could be used instead to improve the United States’ fighting capabilities. Military analysts agree. They say that this may be the last chance the Pentagon has to save money by shuttering bases because Congress likely will resist approving another round of closures given the pain this one caused. The nine-member commission reviewing Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld’s plan to restructure the U.S. domestic base network sent President George W. Bush the report in September. It called for closing 22 major military bases and reconfiguring another 33. Hundreds of smaller facilities from coast to coast also will close, shrink or grow. The commission said the plan would mean annual savings of $4.2 billion, compared with $5.4 billion a year under the Pentagon’s original plan. Rumsfeld had recommended closing 33 major bases and realigning 29 others, but the commission made changes even as it signed off on most of the sweeping plan. In the biggest decisions, the commission voted in August to keep open a historic shipyard in Kittery, Maine, a submarine base in Groton, Conn., and Air Force bases in New Mexico and South Dakota. Lawmakers representing those states, including Thune, had waged fierce lobbying campaigns to get the panel to spare their facilities. Commissioners denied politics played a role in their decisions. The panel also crafted its own shake-up of Air National Guard units across the country, choosing not to endorse a Pentagon plan that drew heavy opposition from state governors and was arguably the most contentious issue in the round of base closures. “Once the commission removed so many bases from the list, they not only caused individual members to reverse their parochial positions, they also removed the concern that the Pentagon messed up the process so badly that it was fundamentally flawed,” Berteau said. “They also removed the view that the commission was just a rubber stamp.” As a result, he said, wide-scale opposition in Congress to the plan dropped. The president signed off on the report and sent it to Congress on Sept. 15. That triggered a 45-legislative-day window for the report to become law unless both chambers pass a resolution killing the process. Congress authorized this round of closures after the White House threatened to veto an entire defense spending bill if the Pentagon did not get the go-ahead. Since then, the House has consistently supported closing bases. An early effort to derail the closures by several GOP senators whose bases were originally slated for closure fizzled out when the base closing commission spared their facilities. On the Net: Base-closing commission final 2005 report: www.brac.gov/finalreport.asp The military has slated 22 major bases for closure. An additional 33 major bases will be reduced or increased in size. Hundreds of small facilities from coast to coast also will close, shrink or grow. The Pentagon defines “major” as facilities whose replacement cost would be $100 million or greater. TO CLOSE Alaska: Kulis Air Guard Station (closure was conditioned on there being enough federal money to relocate operations elsewhere) California: Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach Concord Detachment Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant Onizuka Air Force Station Georgia: Fort McPherson Fort Gillem Naval Air Station Atlanta Indiana: Newport Chemical Depot (closure was conditioned upon completion of treaty obligations) Kansas: Kansas Army Ammunition Plant Maine: Naval Air Station Brunswick Michigan: Selfridge Army Activity Mississippi: Mississippi Army Ammunition Plant Naval Station Pascagoula (was badly damaged by Hurricane Katrina, some repairs already under way) New Jersey: Fort Monmouth (closure was conditioned on an assurance that research under way in connection with the war on terrorism won’t be disrupted) Oregon: Umatilla Chemical Depot (closure was conditioned upon completion of treaty obligations) Pennsylvania: Naval Air Station Willow Grove Texas: Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant Naval Station Ingleside Brooks City-Base Utah: Deseret Chemical Depot (closure was conditioned upon completion of treaty obligations and a study to see whether the depot can be converted for another use) Virginia: Fort Monroe Wisconsin: General Mitchell Air Reserve Station – Associated Press160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – A plan to close and reconfigure hundreds of military bases is sailing through Congress, on track to take effect next month in a blow to communities hoping for an eleventh-hour reprieve. In a long-shot attempt to halt the first round of base closings in a decade, the House planned a vote today on a proposal to reject the final report of the 2005 base-closing commission. Even base-closing opponents considered the effort certain to fail, like Congress’ attempts to stop the four previous rounds. To kill the process, the Senate also would have to veto the report – and the chances of that are slim to none. In both chambers, opposition has been muted by the elimination of several major bases from the Pentagon’s original list of closures and the recent focus on Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. “I can’t see anything that stops it,” said David Berteau, a military analyst who oversaw base closings for the Pentagon in 1991 and 1993. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Even the Republican sponsor of the House resolution acknowledged that he expects the proposed shake-up of the far-flung domestic military network to become law during the second week of November. “I know that this is an uphill battle,” said Rep. Ray LaHood, R-Ill. “I’ve been around long enough to know we’ll be lucky to get 100 votes” in the 435-member House. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., who led early opposition in the Senate after the Pentagon proposed closing an Air Force base in his state, said the House vote would put the epitaph on a dead issue. “Unless the House in some miraculous way finds the votes to overturn the BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure commission) decisions, I think it’s pretty much a done deal, and I think most people over here view it that way,” Thune said. Congressional critics and many local officials fear the impact of base closures on their area economies – and on their political futures. They argue that the United States should not restructure military bases while the U.S. military is engaged in Iraq and Afghanistan. last_img read more

Man refused bail as court hears victim lost parts of ears

first_imgA man appeared in court this morning in relation to an alleged incident in Letterkenny that left another man missing the top of his two ears.Tony Dempsey (pictured above), with an address at 21 St Eunan’s Terrace in Letterkenny, was arrested following the alleged incident at that address on Sunday night. Dempsey was arrested at the scene at 11.15pm on Sunday and taken to Letterkenny Garda Station, where he was charged under section 4 of the Criminal Law Act 1997 and section 3 of the Non Fatal Offence Against the Person Act 1997.Dempsey responded ‘no reply’ to each caution.Letterkenny District Court heard that Dempsey made ‘a number of admissions’ while in custody.“There was no admission in relation to the missing ears,” said defence solicitor Patsy Gallagher. “There were admissions made regarding an assault.”The court heard that the injured party, who is not from the jurisdiction, was missing ‘the top part of his two ears’.The alleged victim is in Letterkenny University Hospital waiting to be transferred to have surgery.Gardai objected to the bail of Dempsey, who has eight bench warrants to his name dating back to 2009, arguing that he was a flight risk.“He has never left the jurisdiction, ever and he has never held a passport,” Mr Gallagher said.“Admissions that were made have to be in context. There was an argument of provocation. That was proffered in the interview.“He has put forward his mobile phone and he has had no interaction with the injured party, apart from this one day. He is happy to stay away from the alleged injured party or any witnesses”“He has resided for some time with his sister in Letterkenny.”The court heard that Dempsey was in a rehab centre in Tipperary, where he spent four months, when the last two bench warrants were issued.Gardai said that the defendant’s sister had been living in the house for only two weeks and had been given notice by her landlord to vacate the house within two days.Dempsey’s solicitor said his client could move to Dublin to reside with his grandmother, but Gardai noted that Dempsey had 28 different addresses, indicating his ‘transient nature’.Given the seriousness of the offence, the evidence put forward and the likely sentence, Judge Paul Kelly said he was concerned that Dempsey wouldn’t appear for a trial and remanded him in custody to appear, via video link, at next Monday’s sitting of Letterkenny District Court.Dempsey will also appear at a Dublin Court on Thursday on foot of a bench warrant issued earlier this year in relation to an alleged road traffic matter.Man refused bail as court hears victim lost parts of ears was last modified: November 8th, 2017 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Judge Paul KellyletterkennyLetterkenny District CourtTony Dempseylast_img read more