Preview: QPR need to get back on track

first_imgNow at QPR, James Perch (left) scored for Wigan the last time they hosted RangersDefeats against Barnsley and Preston stalled QPR’s good start to the season. Today they have a chance to bounce back at Wigan.Kick-off: 3pm, Saturday 27 August 2016Referee: Chris Kavanagh (Ashton-under-Lyne, Greater Manchester)BetVictor.com preview: Rangers out to 10/1 after successive defeatsVital statistic: QPR are undefeated in their last seven matches against Wigan in all competitions – but have failed to win 10 of their last 11 away matches.Injuries and suspensionsWIGANRuled out: Donervan Daniels (knee), Reece James (ankle), Andy Kellett (knee), Kyle Knoyle (elbow).QPRRuled out:  Jamie Mackie (ankle), Jack Robinson (knee), Ben Gladwin (ankle).Doubtful: Nasser El Khayati (back), Joel Lynch (abdominal strain). Possible starting line-upsWigan: Bogdan; Burke, Morgan, Buxton, Warnock, Garbutt; Gilbey, Powell, Power, Wildschut; Grigg.QPR: Smithies; Onuoha, Caulker, Hall, Bidwell; Henry, Luongo; Cousins, Chery, Ngbakoto; Polter. Facts and figuresFORM GUIDE (last five league matches)Wigan: L D W L L (4 points) • Home: D W L W W (10 points)QPR: L L W W W (9 points) • Away: L W L L D (4 points)TOP SCORERS (league only)Wigan – 3: Grigg; 1: Davies, Gilbey, Jacobs, Powell.QPR – 3: Chery; 2: Polter; 1: Caulker, Onuoha.LAST FIVE MEETINGS12 May 2014: QPR 2 Wigan 19 May 2014: Wigan 0 QPR 025 Mar 2014: QPR 1 Wigan 030 Oct 2013: Wigan 0 QPR 07 Apr 2013: QPR 1 Wigan 1Wigan 0 wins, QPR 2 wins, 3 drawsSee also:Hasselbaink urges fans to keep backing QPR youngstersQPR assessing El Khayati injuryQPR’s plan to build up Borysiuk’s fitness Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Gallery: The untamed Northern Cape

first_imgIt’s the largest and hottest province in South Africa, taking up a full third of the country’s land area. But the Northern Cape is also wild and empty, mostly desert and semi-desert. Under 2% of South Africa’s people live there.The 60-metre Augrabies Falls on the Orange River. The original Khoikhoi inhabitants named the falls “Ankoerebis”, or “place of big noises”. Later Afrikaner settlers then derived the name “Augrabies”. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Mary AlexanderIt’s September. It’s spring in South Africa – and Tourism Month, celebrated this year with the theme “Tourism for All”.To inspire your next road trip we bring you nine galleries, one for each province, showcasing our country’s remarkable beauty and diversity.A thriving tourism industry means South Africa is closer to achieving its National Development Plan goals of skills development and creating decent employment through inclusive economic growth.The vast wilderness of the Nortern Cape holds weird lunar landscapes, exotic plants and animals, the Richtersveld World Heritage site and the Big Hole diamond mine, possibly the largest hand-dug excavation in the world.In early spring the barren Namaqualand sees a sudden, brief and brilliant bloom of flowers carpeting the landscape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Sister Januar outside the Catholic Cathedral in the Northern Cape town of Pella. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Arri Raats, a member of the Khomani San Bushmen, at Boesmansrus camp in the Kalahari. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Canoeing on the Orange River at sunset in Vioolsdrift, in the Richtersveld region of the Northern Cape. The Orange is the longest river in South Africa, rising in the Drakensberg mountains in Lesotho and flowing westwards to empty in the Atlantic Ocean. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Brilliantly coloured Augrabies flat lizards are endemic to the Northern Cape, and common on the granite walls of Augrabies Falls National Park. In summer they delight tourists with their acrobatic leaps to catch black flies swarming near the falls. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A seal colony on the rocky shores of the Namaqua National Park. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Crafts for sale at a tourist market in Pofadder, Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Donkey cart drivers in Andriesvale in the Kalahari. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Arnie Braam in Klein Pella, Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Desert dunes in Witsand – “white sands” – Nature Reserve near Postmasburg in the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A farm in Vioolsdrift. Irrigation from the great Orange River and from groundwater allows farmers to produce crops in the desert. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Quiver trees – kokerboom in Afrikaans – in the Kalahari. San Bushman hunter-gatherers used the trees to make quivers for their arrows. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Sutherland Observatory on a starry night. There is little light pollution in the remote Northern Cape, making the province ideal for major international astronomy initiatives such as the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and the Square Kilometre Array, or SKA. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Meerkats in the desert of the Kalahari Red Dune Route in the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)An old shipwreck rusts into the shore of the Namaqua National Park on the West Coast. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Inside the McGregor Museum, an important cultural and natural history research institute, in Kimberley, the capital of the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Palm trees against the late afternoon sun in Klein Pella, on the banks of the Orange River. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The mountainous desert landscape of the Richtersveld. The region is the only arid biodiversity hotspot on earth, with an amazing variety of plant, bird and animal life. The Richtersveld Cultural and Botanical Landscape is a Unesco World Heritage site. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Big Hole in Kimberley, the capital of the Northern Cape, is thought to be the largest hand-dug excavation in the world. Once an open-pit diamond mine, some three metric tons of diamonds were extracted from the hole – displacing 22-million tons of earth – between 1872 and 1914. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A massive communal sociable weaver bird’s nest envelops an acacia tree in the Kgalakgadi Transfrontier Park in the north of the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Steenbok amid indigenous desert vegetation in the Namaqua National Park. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The local maritime museum in the West Coast town of Port Nolloth. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A dog sits with its driver as they make their way through Vioolsdrift in the Richtersveld. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)last_img read more

Federal judge rules against California’s attorney general in Prop 65 Case

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In another win for U.S. agriculture and the national agriculture coalition fighting California’s false and misleading Prop 65 labeling requirement for glyphosate, U.S. District Court Judge William Shubb, for the Eastern District of California, upheld the preliminary injunction prohibiting California from enforcing the requirement until a final ruling on the matter is issued by the court.California Attorney General Xavier Beccera had filed a motion to lift a preliminary injunction issued by the court in February prohibiting the state from enforcing its labeling requirement. That motion was denied by Judge Shubb, who upheld the preliminary injunction prohibiting the state from enforcing its Prop 65 labeling requirement for glyphosate until all of the facts are considered by the court.“California is attempting to implement a policy that would cause damage to American farmers,” said Chandler Goule, Chief Executive Officer for the National Association of Wheat Growers. “The facts and science are on our side which show that glyphosate is safe for use. Farmers and growers are defending U.S. agriculture against California’s false and misleading Prop 65 labeling requirement, and maintaining this preliminary injunction is another win for them.”In the order, Judge Shubb ruled the state’s additional arguments “[do] not change the fact that the overwhelming majority of agencies that that have examined glyphosate have determined it is not a cancer risk.” (p. 5). He also reiterated that “the heavy weight of evidence in the record is that glyphosate is not known to cause cancer.” (p. 9)Glyphosate is approved for application in over 250 agricultural crops throughout the United States. Despite scientific findings from hundreds of studies and conclusions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and regulatory agencies around the world that glyphosate is safe for use, California ignored facts, data, and science when it added glyphosate to the state’s Prop 65 list.For more information on the national agriculture coalition and glyphosate go to FixProp65.com.The National Association of Wheat Growers are the lead plaintiff in the case against California filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California. The plaintiffs include the Agribusiness Association of Iowa, the Agricultural Retailers Association, Associated Industries of Missouri, Iowa Soybean Association, Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry, CropLife America, Missouri Farm Bureau, National Corn Growers Association, North Dakota Grain Growers Association, South Dakota Agri-Business Association and United States Durum Growers Association.last_img read more

Best of Last Week – New fusion power design a space elevator

first_img In other news, a company in Canada got a U.S. patent for a space elevator—their idea is to use modular tubes of Kevlar-polyethylene composites filled with helium to build the structure, which they claim would reach to 12 miles high. The elevator could be used to carry cargo and humans to that height and at the top would be a runway for space planes to take off and land. And another international team of astronomers reported that they have been charting the slow death of the universe. They have conducted the most comprehensive assessment yet of the energy output of the universe measuring the energy generated by 200,000 galaxies, and have found that it is approximately half of what it was two billion years ago.Also, in an interesting turn of events, a team of researchers at Northwestern University uncovered a difference between the sexes—other than the obvious ones, of course. They found evidence of male and female human brains operating differently at the molecular level. Meanwhile, another team of molecular scientists unexpectedly produced a new type of glass—and it might lead to improvements in efficiency of electronic devices.And finally, if you are one of the many people attempting to lose weight by dieting, you might want to know that a team of researchers with US National Institutes of Health has found that a low-fat diet results in more fat loss than low-carb diets, in humans. Now all you will have to do is stick to it. Citation: Best of Last Week – New fusion power design, a space elevator and low-fat diet found to be better than low-carb diet (2015, August 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-08-week-fusion-power-space-elevator.html © 2015 Phys.org Explore further A cutaway view of the proposed ARC reactor. Thanks to powerful new magnet technology, the much smaller, less-expensive ARC reactor would deliver the same power output as a much larger reactor. Credit: the MIT ARC teamcenter_img (Phys.org)—It was a big week for physics—a research team at MIT created a superfluid in a record-high magnetic field—a Bose-Einstein condensate—for a tenth of a second. And another team at MIT announced a new design that could finally help to bring fusion power closer to reality—in as little as ten years. Meanwhile, a team working at CERN found that protons and antiprotons appear to be true mirror images—the most precise measurements of their charge-to-mass ratio to date. And researchers working at the South Pole-based IceCube experiment reported that a cosmic mystery deepened with the discovery of a new ultra-high-energy neutrino—making it the fourth and highest-energy neutrino yet observed. Also, a team at CalTech announced a discovery in fundamental physics—pinpointing for the first time how instabilities in the arrangement of electrons in metals arise. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Cosmic mystery deepens with discovery of new ultra-high-energy neutrinolast_img read more

Bengali film on treasure hunt to be released soon

first_imgKolkata: Byomkesh-actor Abir Chatterjee will now don the hat of a treasure hunter in ‘Guptodhoner Sondhane’, which is claimed to be the first big Bengali film on treasure hunt, will be released this month. Eminent Bengali directors Goutam Ghosh, Kamaleswar Mukherjee and Arindam Sil are part of the team as the director Dhrubo Banerjee said they were here to enhance the quality of the film.Popular Bengali hero Abir Chatterjee said neither Sil, nor Ghosh nor Mukherjee carried the baggage of a film maker during the film’s shoot but did not divulge how their role unfolded in the film. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights”All the three portray very interesting and important characters but how that will be a surprise. All I can say they brought more layers to the film,” the director said.Chatterjee, who had also portrayed the character of iconic Bengali sleuth ‘Byomkesh Bakshi’ in a string of Bengali films, said, “Bengalis are losing the spirit of going on exploration for treasure hunt. The film aims at fostering that spirit of adventures in every Bengali. To my knowledge it is the first big Bengali production on embarking on adventure for hidden treasure.” Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedChatterjee had been cast as Byomkesh in several films including Byomkesh Pawrbo, Har Har Byomkesh, Byomkesh Phire Elo, Badshahi Angti (featuring iconic sleuth Feluda) among others.Asked if his image as Byomkesh or Feluda will not come in the way of establishing the new role of a treasure-hunter history professor, visiting the country after seven years, Chatterjee said, “We are actors first and portray the role as demanded by the script. The audience is mature enough.” He said the film had references to the history of Bengal.”Instead of past instances of films based on literary works, here the films will be followed by novels in print and graphic novels. We intend to start a franchise,” he said.About casting Chatterjee in the lead role, he said, “I did not seek to find similarities between his portrayal as Feluda or Byomkesh. But I liked his smart and intelligent look which can be moulded in a different way than the previous characters.”Sonada aka Subarno Sen, the protagonist in his film, may give a break from the monotony of iconic characters of Feluda and Byomkesh to the Bengali audience, he said.’Guptodhoner Sondhane’ is the first instalment of a brand new franchise being introduced by SVF, Srikant Mohta said on behalf of the producers.last_img read more